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Library Philosophy and Practice 2010

ISSN 1522-0222

Post-UME Screening Examination in Nigerian Universities: The University of Education, Ikere-Ekiti (Tunedik) Experience

Isaac Oluwadare Busayo
Nimbe Adedipe Library
University Of Agriculture
P.M.B.2240,Abeokuta
Ogun State, Nigeria

 

Introduction

Like other countries, Nigeria has a body that regulates educational qualifying examinations. Four prominent public examination bodies in Nigeria are the Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB), headed by Professor Dibu Ojerinde, the National Business and Technical Examination Board (NABTEB), headed by Professor David Awambor, the National Examination Council (NECO), headed by Professor Promise Okpala, and the West African Examination Council (WAEC), headed by Dr. Iyi Uwadiae (Idoko 2008). It is mandatory that candidates seeking admission to any of the university in Nigeria, whether federal, state, or private, take and pass the Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB) Examination before being considered for the Post-University Matriculation Examination screening, conducted by each university before the admission of these who qualify or pass.

TUNEDIK

The University of Education, Ikere-Ekiti (TUNEDIK) was established in 2007 by the administration of Governor (Engr) Adebayo Segun Oni of Ekiti State, Nigeria and approved by the National Universities Commission (NUC) on January 20, 2008 as the 31st state university and the 92nd university in Nigeria. (Ogunyemi 2008).

Universities in Nigeria

The Federal Military Government in Nigeria established six additional universities in 1976 in addition to the seven existing ones (Idoko (2008). The number of universities and degree-awarding institutions in Nigeria date has increased considerably. The list as contained in the 2008 JAMB Brochure includes:

  • Federal Universities: 16
  • Universities of Agriculture: 3
  • Federal Universities of Technology: 5
  • State Universities: 21
  • Universities of Education: 2
  • State Universities of Technology: 4
  • Private Universities: 22
  • Other Degree Awarding Institutions: 19
  • Total: 92

History of Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB)

Prior to the establishment of JAMB in 1978, each university was responsible for the conduct of its own concessional examination and admitted its own students. This system had serious limitations and was inefficient. The committee of Vice-Chancellors was concerned about this problem. Consequently, the government set up a National Committee on University Entrance Examination under the Chairmanship of Mr. M. S. Angulu and that Committee recommended setting up JAMB.

In 1987, the Board performed the exemplary feat of printing examination materials in Nigeria. Since then, the Board's question papers have always been produced and answer scripts processed in Nigeria (Idoko 2008). JAMB has introduced e-registration to reduce stress and replace the cumbersome process of registration, in which candidates have to travel to purchase and submit JAMB forms. Other problems included locating examination centers and accessing results.

Introduction of Post-UME Screening by Universities

Amatareotubo (2006) describes how the federal government of Nigeria introduced the policy of Post-JAMB screening by universities in 2005, through the Minister of Education, Mrs. Chinwe Obaji. This policy made it mandatory for all tertiary institutions to screen candidates after their JAMB results and before giving admission. Candidates with a score of 200 and above would be shortlisted by JAMB and their names and scores sent to their universities of choice which would screen again using aptitude tests, oral interviews, or even another examination. Obaji asserts that some candidates scored 280 and above in JAMB but could not score 20 percent in the post-JAMB examination, believing that those students must have cheated on their JAMB examinations and could not pass the Post-JAMB examination because there was no way to cheat.

Literature Review

Scholars have argued for and against the Post-Universities Matriculation Examination (UME) in Nigerian universities. Sobechi (2008) quotes the Vice-Chancellor of Ebonyi State University (EBSU), Professor Fidelis Ogah, as saying that he had refused to bow to pressure to conduct Post-UME tests because most institutions have turned it to a goldmine. Ogah alleged that most Nigerian universities that conduct Post-UME do so primarily to wring money from rich parents, whose children could not be admitted using JAMB results. Ogah stated that he had ignored pressure to conduct the test, pointing out that if he lacked confidence in the credibility of JAMB, he would lack confidence in a post-UME examination as well.

Similarly, during the 33rd and 34th convocation ceremony of the University of Benin, President Musa Yar'Adua of Nigeria, through the Director of Tertiary Education in the Federal Ministry of Education, Dr. Emmanuel Okon, remarked that the PUME may be cancelled if complaints against its conduct by students, parents, and guardians persist (Aliu 2008).

The Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB), the statutory body assigned to conduct admission examinations, and the National Universities Commission (NUC) have been directed to streamline Post-UME screening in order to avoid government intervention and the elimination of Post-UME screening. The JAMB Registrar, Professor Dibu Ojerinde, also lamented that universities have turned the UME screening into a money-making venture, as reported by Badmus and Idoko (2008). The House of Representatives Committee on Education in their oversight visits to educational agencies learned that universities had turned the screening of students seeking admission into a money-making venture. To stem the trend, the Chairman of the Committee, Honourable Farouk Lawan, suggested the need to call a stakeholders' meeting on the issue.

As the NUC began the accreditation of universities in 2009, Professor Peter Okebukola, the immediate past Executive Secretary of NUC and a member of the panel set to study university administration, said that institutional accreditation would precede course accreditation in Nigerian universities, noting that Nigeria, unlike the US, Europe, and Asia, only carried out course accreditation without accrediting the institutions offering these programmes (Makinde 2008).

Okebukola stated that this practice was one of the factors responsible for the quality of products turned out of the nation's tertiary institutions. He explained that institutional accreditation would consider the quality of students being admitted, staff, facilities, learning environment, and the university management. Okebukola stressed the need for graduates who are nationally relevant and globally competitive.

Some students employ unethical means to pass JAMB on their first attempt, while others do nothing of the kind. Clarence Peters states that, “when I finished Secondary School, I sat for JAMB because we had some financial difficulties and also to fulfill all righteousness, and, thankfully, I failed” Lawal (2008). Ogunleye (2008) reports that the Wesley University of Science and Technology (WUSTO), established by the Methodist Church Nigeria (MCN), licensed by the Federal Government in May 2007, has conducted its first UME screening. Oyedele (2008) quotes the University of Ado Ekiti Vice-Chancellor, Professor Dipo Kolawole, a well-known supporter of the post-UME test, as saying that “in the past a student will score 289, automatically he comes in, but with the Post-UME now, you find that such a student is scoring a very poor mark. They cannot even write. If we desire sanitation of our educational system … it does not make sense for anybody to be against the post-UME. If there are other built in mechanisms to purify the admission process … it should be a welcome idea..”

Makinde (2009) states that Professor Philip Abiodun, The Vice-Chancellor, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State, has asserted that “two exams are not too many to sieve qualified candidates from those who cheated to pass.” He observed that after comparing the results of the two exams one would be able to know who truly passed and who cheated. He noted that while some students scored very high marks in JAMB, they scored very low on the post-UME.

Post-UME Screening Examination at TUNEDIK

The University of Education Ikere-Ekiti (TUNEDIK) officially opened in May 2008. To allow prospective candidates to apply, those who earlier applied to JAMB, wrote the 2008 Universities Matriculation Examination, and attained the prescribed national minimum score were asked to apply to TUNEDIK, provided they met the minimum entry requirements.

TUNEDIK conducted two Post-UME screening examinations. The first was an objective text based on the subject/course areas of the candidates while the second examination was an essay test for those who passed the first examination.

The essay examination revealed the inadequacies of some of the candidates. Many who scored high in JAMB and in the first screening examination performed badly in the essay writing. The results of the two examinations were computed to determine eligible candidates for admission.

Analysis of Findings of the Post-UME Screening

A sample of five hundred candidates was drawn. One hundred were drawn each from the Faculty of Education, Department of Educational Management, Faculty of Arts, Department of English, Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Department of Economics, Faculty of Science, Department of Pure Sciences (Biology), and Faculty of Science and Information Technology, Department of Applied Sciences (Computer and ICT).

(a) Department of Educational Management Table IA Shows Candidates (50) who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (400%) POST-UME I (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 235 44 05
2. 227 44 05
3. 252 51 05
4. 211 44 05
5. 202 41 05
6. 218 42 06
7. 206 41 06
8. 212 44 08
9. 203 40 08
10. 219 45 08
11. 205 41 08
12. 214 44 09
13. 240 42 10
14. 206 44 10
15. 212 45 10
16. 204 41 10
17. 207 44 12
18. 205 47 12
19. 207 49 12
20. 240 48 12
21. 207 49 12
22. 217 42 12
23. 220 42 13
24. 215 51 13
25. 215 41 13
26. 238 44 14
27. 203 44 14
28. 207 43 14
29. 208 44 14
30. 266 62 15
31. 202 44 15
32. 210 44 15
33. 208 40 16
34. 238 46 17
35. 202 41 17
36. 208 45 18
37. 218 48 18
38. 203 43 20
39. 203 44 20
40. 226 49 20
41. 230 48 20
42. 213 41 22
43. 208 47 22
44. 203 48 23
45. 229 48 24
46. 206 47 25
47. 240 46 28
48. 200 44 32
49. 255 57 32
50. 213 51 38

Only 13 of the 50 candidates who scored 200 and above in JAMB made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 26 percent.

(b) Department of Educational Management: Table 1B Shows candidates (25) who scored 190-199 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (400%) POST-UME I (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 198 43 02
2. 195 40 08
3. 190 42 08
4. 190 41 09
5. 196 44 10
6. 195 44 10
7. 195 42 10
8. 198 40 13
9. 190 44 14
10. 195 44 16
11. 191 48 17
12. 197 41 17
13. 197 42 18
14. 198 44 18
15. 193 45 18
16. 192 42 18
17. 199 49 18
18. 194 45 20
19. 196 43 22
20. 197 45 22
21. 196 42 24
22. 194 45 25
23. 198 45 25
24 194 45 25
25. 194 41 38

Eight of the twenty-five who scored between 190-199 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 32 percent.

(c) Department of Educational Management: Table 1C Shows candidates (25) who scored 180-189 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (400%) POST-UME I (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 182 42 05
2. 181 43 06
3. 182 45 07
4. 184 42 07
5. 184 43 08
6. 184 40 08
7. 180 44 10
8. 188 40 10
9. 184 42 12
10. 181 41 13
11. 182 43 14
12. 182 42 14
13. 185 43 15
14. 187 43 15
15. 185 42 15
16. 183 45 16
17. 187 42 18
18. 187 42 16
19. 181 44 19
20. 180 44 19
21. 183 45 20
22. 186 42 22
23. 188 44 25
24 182 42 31
25. 184 43 33

Table 1c above shows that only 5 of the 25 candidates who score between 180-189 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 20 percent.

(d) Department of English: Table IIA Shows candidates (50) who scored 200 marks above in JAMB)

S/N JAMB SCORES (400%) POST-UME I (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 214 45 01
2. 214 51 08
3. 241 60 09
4. 202 56 09
5. 264 53 09
6. 212 50 10
7. 214 52 10
8. 214 52 10
9. 210 56 12
10. 218 48 12
11. 213 56 12
12. 279 64 12
13. 220 56 13
14. 214 59 14
15. 205 52 14
16. 204 51 15
17. 237 60 15
18. 204 52 15
19. 205 58 16
20. 201 56 18
21. 209 54 18
22. 201 51 18
23. 207 57 18
24 238 65 19
25. 238 65 19
26. 230 56 19
27. 262 58 20
28. 202 56 20
29. 236 59 20
30. 254 69 20
31. 202 55 21
32. 202 55 22
33. 230 63 22
34. 232 62 22
35. 207 54 23
36. 210 55 24
37. 227 56 24
38. 202 54 24
39. 203 53 25
40. 209 52 26
41. 207 59 28
42. 248 68 29
43. 248 68 29
44. 206 56 30
45. 257 62 31
46. 203 53 32
47 226 58 32
48. 234 61 32
49. 214 57 33
50. 219 60 33

Table IIA above shows a better performance as 24 of the 50 candidates who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB, made 40 (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 48 percent.

(e) Department of Educational Management: Table IIB Shows candidates (25) who scored 190-199 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (400%) POST-UME I (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 197 46 05
2. 194 52 08
3. 195 49 12
4. 193 52 13
5. 196 56 14
6. 198 53 14
7. 193 50 15
8. 197 52 15
9. 195 48 16
10. 195 48 16
11. 199 45 17
12. 193 53 17
13. 199 51 18
14. 193 51 18
15. 198 53 18
16. 190 54 18
17. 194 45 20
18. 195 56 22
19. 198 30 23
20. 192 50 24
21. 190 53 24
22. 192 50 24
23. 199 56 25
24. 194 46 28
25. 194 53 32

In table IIB above, 9 of the 25 candidates who scored between 190-199 in JAMB made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 36 percent.

(f) Department of English: Table IIC Shows candidates (25) who scored 180-189 marks in JAMB.

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 188 52 13
2. 186 45 14
3. 184 53 15
4. 186 47 16
5. 180 49 16
6. 184 50 18
7. 180 52 18
8. 188 50 18
9. 180 51 18
10. 181 50 19
11. 181 50 19
12. 188 53 20
13. 181 49 20
14. 184 43 20
15. 181 45 21
16. 181 44 21
17. 181 59 22
18. 181 48 22
19. 185 52 22
20. 185 48 23
21. 185 47 23
22. 182 47 24
23. 185 45 32
24. 189 55 34
25. 189 56 34

Table IIc above shows that 14 of the 25 candidates, who scored between 180-189 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 56 percent.

(g) Department of Economics: Table IIIA Shows candidates (50) who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB.

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 248 47 01
2. 212 47 09
3. 244 46 09
4. 221 49 10
5. 231 49 10
6. 227 47 12
7. 251 57 12
8. 244 49 12
9. 249 50 13
10. 203 47 13
11 214 48 13
12. 220 50 14
13. 202 46 15
14. 266 57 16
15. 274 51 16
16. 203 53 16
17. 203 53 16
18. 206 48 17
19. 227 46 18
20. 259 52 18
21. 240 49 19
22. 233 50 19
23. 217 47 19
24. 237 59 20
25. 249 56 20
26. 225 49 22
27. 216 48 23
28. 210 50 23
29. 227 53 24
30. 213 46 24
31. 213 46 24
32. 204 46 25
33. 243 56 25
34. 203 46 25
35. 222 48 25
36. 214 48 25
37. 212 47 25
38. 208 47 25
39. 230 51 25
40. 249 52 26
41. 253 53 28
42. 200 46 29
43. 223 51 29
44. 217 49 30
45. 218 51 30
46. 205 50 31
47. 219 53 32
48. 217 50 33
49. 247 51 34
50. 253 56 36

Table IIIA also shows that 27 of the 50 candidates who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 54 percent.

(h) Department of Economics: Table IIIB Shows candidates (25) who scored 190-199 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 198 50 06
2. 190 43 06
3. 198 48 10
4. 194 47 11
5. 198 47 12
6. 196 47 14
7. 194 48 15
8. 191 44 16
9. 196 46 19
10. 198 47 20
11. 190 47 20
12. 198 50 21
13. 192 46 21
14. 191 46 21
15. 192 46 21
16. 197 47 21
17. 194 48 21
18. 195 45 23
19. 191 49 23
20. 197 46 24
21. 194 46 24
22. 199 50 27
23. 191 49 28
24. 197 49 32
25. 196 49 37

In table IIIB, 16 of the 25 candidates who scored 190-199 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 64 percent.

(i) Department of Economics: Table IIIC Shows candidates (25) who scored 180-189 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 188 42 06
2. 189 45 08
3. 182 45 08
4. 187 40 10
5. 184 49 10
6. 185 48 15
7. 188 48 15
8. 185 47 15
9. 188 46 16
10. 189 49 17
11. 183 49 17
12. 183 50 17
13. 187 46 18
14. 187 48 18
15. 186 46 20
16. 181 49 20
17. 187 46 23
18. 184 46 24
19. 182 47 24
20. 183 47 25
21. 1888 45 25
22. 181 47 26
23. 188 43 28
24. 180 41 28
25. 188 50 28

Table IIIC indicates that 11 of the 25 candidates who scored between 180-189 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 44 percent.

(J) Department of Pure Sciences (Biology): Table IVA Shows candidates (25) who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 203 48 08
2. 202 44 10
3. 212 44 12
4. 218 46 12
5. 205 46 12
6. 209 54 15
7. 221 48 16
8. 203 46 16
9. 244 48 18
10. 227 47 18
11. 264 50 18
12. 231 45 20
13. 209 52 20
14. 232 51 20
15. 200 50 22
16. 266 58 24
17. 267 54 25
18. 213 50 25
19. 243 52 25
20. 208 47 26
21. 209 45 27
22. 264 53 28
23. 281 58 29
24. 217 51 29
25. 224 56 36

Table IVA above shows that 14 of the 25 candidates who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 56 percent.

(k) Department of Pure Sciences (Biology): Table IVB Shows candidates (25) who scored 190-199 marks in JAMB.

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 191 43 02
2. 190 41 07
3. 195 43 10
4. 198 48 11
5. 196 48 12
6. 196 43 12
7. 192 50 13
8. 197 48 15
9. 193 44 15
10. 192 50 16
11. 196 45 18
12. 196 45 18
13. 192 50 18
14. 193 49 19
15. 199 46 19
16. 196 47 19
17. 190 49 20
18. 192 44 21
19. 199 49 22
20. 191 43 25
21. 190 47 26
22. 196 45 27
23. 192 48 30
24. 199 48 31
25. 198 46 36

In table IVB above, 9 of the 25 candidates who scored between 190-199 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 36 percent.

(L) Department of Pure science (Biology): Table IVC Shows candidates (25) who scored 180-189 marks in JAMB

S/N

JAMB SCORES (40%)

POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%)

POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)

1.

182

41

4

2.

184

41

5

3.

181

42

8

4.

184

43

8

5.

186

49

10

6.

182

48

10

7.

188

49

13

8.

186

45

13

9.

187

46

14

10.

181

46

14

11.

184

45

14

12.

188

46

14

13.

182

46

15

14.

181

43

15

15.

185

47

18

16.

182

44

18

17.

187

43

20

18.

187

46

20

19.

187

43

20

20.

186

46

20

21.

183

43

20

22.

188

47

20

23.

180

44

24

24.

189

45

24

25.

188

50

28

In table IVC above, 9 of the 25 candidates, who scored between 180-189 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 36 percent.

(M) Department of Pure Science (Biology): Table IVD Shows candidates (25) who scored 170-179 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 170 41 01
2. 174 41 07
3. 173 43 08
4. 176 41 09
5. 179 41 10
6. 173 44 10
7. 176 40 11
8. 175 43 12
9. 178 47 13
10. 178 41 13
11. 177 43 14
12. 171 43 14
13. 175 40 14
14. 176 40 15
15. 175 45 15
16. 171 40 16
17. 176 43 17
18. 171 43 17
19. 177 42 17
20. 176 41 17
21. 172 44 18
22. 170 42 18
23. 177 47 18
24. 173 40 21
25. 179 42 24

Table IVD shows that only 2 of the 25 candidates who scored between 170-179 in JAMB, amde 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 8 percent.

(N) Department of Applied Sciences (Computer & ICT) Shows candidates (25) who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 245 48 08
2. 223 43 08
3. 272 52 10
4. 208 44 12
5. 238 45 14
6. 272 52 17
7. 262 53 17
8. 219 51 17
9. 259 52 17
10. 256 48 18
11. 215 46 18
12. 231 47 18
13. 201 44 18
14. 240 49 19
15. 233 46 19
16. 204 41 19
17. 209 46 20
18. 232 47 20
19. 225 51 20
20. 211 50 20
21. 211 47 23
22. 218 48 25
23. 244 51 26
24. 212 47 27
25. 200 51 35

Table VA shows that 9 of the 25 candidates who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB, amde 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, respresenting 36 percent.

(O) Department of Applied Sciences (Computer & ICT) Table VB Shows candidates (25) who scored 190-199 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 196 41 04
2. 193 47 06
3. 194 41 07
4. 193 55 12
5. 199 44 12
6. 191 43 13
7. 194 43 15
8. 197 45 15
9. 190 43 16
10. 199 51 16
11. 196 42 17
12. 193 44 17
13. 192 46 17
14. 191 44 17
15. 190 43 18
16. 192 46 19
17. 197 40 20
18. 194 47 20
19. 196 45 21
20. 192 46 21
21. 190 44 21
22. 194 45 25
23. 194 46 25
24. 194 46 25
25. 192 48 28

In table VB above, 9 of the 25 candidates who scored between 190-199 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 36 percent.

(P) Department of Applied Sciences (Computer & ICT): Table VC Shows candidates (25) who scored 180-189 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 187 42 12
2. 183 45 13
3. 184 42 14
4. 186 44 15
5. 183 44 15
6. 180 41 15
7. 182 43 16
8. 180 41 16
9. 183 42 18
10. 181 45 18
11. 186 47 18
12. 188 43 19
13. 183 45 21
14. 187 43 22
15. 188 53 22
16. 181 42 23
17. 187 46 24
18. 183 42 24
19. 186 50 24
20. 188 44 25
21. 187 47 25
22. 185 43 26
23. 182 41 26
24. 187 47 26
25. 185 44 30

Table VC above shows that 13 of the 25 candidates who scored between 180-189 in JAMB, made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay Screening test, representing 52 percent.

(Q) Department of Applied Sciences (Computer & ICT): Table VD Shows candidates (25) who scored 170-179 marks in JAMB

S/N JAMB SCORES (40%) POST UME 1 (OBJECTIVE 100%) POST-UME II (ESSAY 50%)
1. 175 44 09
2. 178 46 09
3. 178 44 10
4. 179 43 12
5. 175 41 12
6. 178 45 15
7. 175 42 16
8. 177 41 16
9. 173 41 18
10. 177 41 19
11. 178 40 19
12. 174 42 19
13. 177 44 20
14. 174 43 20
15. 174 43 20
16. 174 47 20
17. 176 43 21
18. 173 44 21
19. 173 41 22
20. 175 43 22
21. 177 41 24
22. 179 41 25
23. 174 41 27
24. 171 40 29
25. 176 46 30

Table VD shows that 13 of the 25 candidates who scored between 170-179 in JAMB made 40 percent (20 marks) and above in the Post-UME essay screening test, representing 52 percent.

Summary of Tables I-V showing candidates who passed (scored 40 percent and above) in the Post-UME (essay) screening test.

  Score Range No of Candidates Percentage (%)
1. 200 & above 87 passed out of 200 43.5
2. 190-199 51 passed out of 125 40.8
3. 180-189 52 passed out of 125 41.6
4. 170-179 15 passed out of 50 30
  Total 205 passed out of 500 155.9

The above shows that 87 of the sampled 200 candidates representing 43.5 percent did well in the Post-UME (essay) screening.

Summary of Tables I-V showing candidates who failed (scored below 40 percent) in the Post-UME (essay) screening Test.

  Score Range No of Candidates Percentage (%)
1. 200 & above 113 failed out of 200 56.5
2. 190-199 74 failed out of 125 59.2
3. 180-189 73 failed out of 125 58.4
4. 170-179 35 failed out of 50 70
  Total 295 failed out of 500 244.1

From the above summary, 113 of the sampled 200 candidates representing 56.5 percent who failed the Post-UME screening would have been admitted automatically, were it not for the Post-UME screening that exposed their lapses.

Justification for Post-UME Screening

The Post-UME screening, especially the essay exam, has helped expose the inadequacies of some candidates. Many who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB performed below expectation in the essay test, and showed a lack of basic writing skills. Before the introduction of post-UME screening, virtually all candidates who scored 200 and above secured admission almost automatically to the university of their choice. With post-UME screening, deficiencies of the candidates are exposed, especially when they are asked to write.

In the study conducted, only 87 of the sampled 200 candidates who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB, representing 43.5 percent, passed the post-UME screening test, while the remaining 113, representing 56.5 percent, performed poorly, scoring less than 40 percent) in the Post-UME screening. This set of candidates would have been admitted on merit to their first or second choice university if there was no post-UME screening. Hence, post-UME screening should not be discarded, but should be strengthened.

Importance of the Library

The performance of candidates in the Post-JAMB screening examination reveals that most do not use the library as they should for their studies.The results also show that the reading habits of candidates and what they read must be monitored for better performance in their public qualifying examinations. This is a service that only the library can provide.The following are being recommended for enhancing candidates' writing skills:

  • The library is an ideal place for reading, which candidates should not dismiss or ignore.
  • Candidates must cultivate the habit of reading fiction, that is, literature and novels that would improve their spoken and written English.
  • The respective libraries must be well-stocked with current books and journals for potential readers.
  • Candidates must make it a point of duty to write at least one essay every two weeks to be marked by their English teacher or their parents/mentor.
  • Candidates should not wait until a day or two before the examination to start reading and preparing. Whoever fails to prepare for an examination must be prepared to fail. 

Recommendations and Conclusion

This study has shown clearly that post-UME screening is a necessity for determining the suitability of candidates for admission to tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The following recommendations are made to further strengthen post-UME screening by the universities in Nigeria.

  • Post-UME screening should include both objective and essay questions to determine the competence of candidates in both areas.
  • Candidates who scored 180 marks and above in JAMB did very well in post-UME screening and, in some cases, better than some who scored 200 marks and above in JAMB; hence, the minimum cut-off mark for eligibility for post-UME screening should be 180 marks and above in JAMB.
  • Candidates for post-UME screening should be screened for the exam and supervised during the exam to guard against cheating.
  • Post-UME screening should not be a money-making activity for univerisites, but for finding the best students to boost the standard of education in Nigeria.

Admission of candidates should be based on the JAMB and post-UME performance, and not on being the highest bidder as alleged by some.

In conclusion, merit should be the sole criterion for university admission in Nigeria, the influence of parents or guardinas notwithstanding. This would motivate young people seeking university admission to work harder. Likewise, the law governing examination malpractice should be enforced and culprits sanctioned to serve as a deterrent to others. These measures would make the unviersity admission system trustworthy and strengthn the credibility of higher education in Nigeria.

References

Aliu, A.O. (2008). FG may scrap Post-UME tests by universities. The Guardian (November): 3.

Amatareotubo, M. (2006). Post-UME screening: Matters arising. Posted to the Web: 8/30/2006 5:49:17pm: amasmozimo@yahoo.co.uk.

Badmus, B. (2008). Rep's fact-finding tour on education. Nigerian Tribune (December 4): 42.

Badmus, B., & Idoko, C. (2008). Varsities conduct Post-UME test for money-JAMB Boss. Nigerian Tribune (November 19): 5.

Idoko, C. (2008). JAMB celebrates 30th anniversary. Nigerian Tribune (December 4): 26.

JAMB Brochure (2008). List of universities and degree awarding institutions in Nigeria. Chapter 4: 15-19.

Lawal, K. (2008). I sat for JAMB and thankfully, I failed - Clarence Peters. Sunday Punch (November 23): 44.

Makinde, F. (2008). NUC begins universities accreditation in 2009. The Punch (November 5): 9.

Makinde, F. (2009). Why Nigerian varsities don't have enough PhD holders-VC. The Punch (April 14): 59.

Ogunleye, O. (2008). WUSTO conducts Post-UME screening. Nigerian Tribune (November 6): 49.

Ogunyemi, E.A. (2008). The University of Education, Ikere-Ekiti: A hand- bill/release.

Ogunyemi, E.A. (2008). The University of Education, Ikere-Ekiti: Application for admission to degree programmes (2008/2009). Nigerian Tribune (Thursday 31 July): 51.

Oyedele, A. (2008). Post-UME should not be scrapped-UNAD VC. The Punch (December 30): 41.

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