[RSS] [Google]
LPP home

Annual volume 2007

Akobundu Dike Ugah

Obstacles to Information Access and Use in Developing Countries (html)

PDF

December 2007
Information is an important economic and political resource. It is vital to development and progress. A society that lacks information or access to it will find it difficult to make meaningful progress. This paper examines obstacles to information access and use. lack of awareness; inaccessibility; information explosion; bibliographic obstacles: environment; poor infrastructure; declining budgets and rising costs; costs for users; staff attitude toward users; and crime. The paper suggests how the obstacles can be overcome.
Paul Adesola Adekunle
Rosnold Ogie Omoba
Adeyinka Tella

Attitudes of Librarians in Selected Nigerian Universities toward the Use of ICT (html)

PDF

December 2007
This study uses a descriptive survey to study the attitude of selected librarians in Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria, toward information communication technology (ICT). The population includes 41 librarians in four institutions. Data were collected using an instrument adapted from the Igberia and Chakrabarti (1990) Computer Anxiety and Attitude Towards Microcomputer use (CAATMU) scale, and the librarian attitude questionnaire developed by Ramzan (2004). Two research questions were developed to guide the study. The results show that librarians have a positive attitude toward ICT and that training and knowledge are thesine qua non for a positive attitude. The fear of ICT that some librarians in Africa demonstrate is widening the digital divide. Librarians in Africa are called upon to rise to the challenges posed by ICT and to help bridge the digital gap.
N. Varatharajan
M. Chandrashekara

Digital Library Initiatives at Higher Education and Research Institutions in India (html)

PDF

December 2007
Digital libraries and digitization play an important role in preserving and disseminating knowledge in art and culture, education, science and technology, literature and humanities, media and entertainment, cultural heritage, and history. In India, a substantial number of libraries and information centres have initiated digital library activities. Indian society has created and preserved the resources of traditional and cultural heritage in various forms; however, thousands of ancient books and manuscripts remain in perishable palm leaves and urgently need digitization. This article describes some of the digital libraries and institutional repositories of India.
Steve McKinzie

Editorial: Our Professional Image (html)

PDF

December 2007
Librarians continue to be preoccupied with out professional image and with lingering stereotypes in popular culture and media. We should follow the example of other professions and take these depictions in stride.
Peter L. Kraus

The Evolution of Instruction in Grant Writing and Research in the Libraries at the University of Utah (html)

PDF

November 2007
An investment in continuing education in the area of grantsmanship for a public services librarian has resulted in the teaching of Grant Writing & Research offered at the J. Willard Marriott Library and the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library on the campus of the University of Utah . This has led to an unexpected method of library outreach to the university faculty and to the community at large, promoting the overall collections and services of the libraries on campus.
Esharenana E. Adomi
Blessing T. Ayo
E. D. Nakpodia

A Better Response Rate for Questionnaires: Attitudes of Librarians in Nigerian University Libraries (html)

PDF

November 2007
This study investigates librarian attitudes towards the completion of questionnaires in Nigerian university libraries. Data was collected from 57 librarians in three Nigerian university libraries. Respondents receive several questionnaires each year. Most respond to all, but those who do not cite lack of time. Those who respond to questionnaires mostly do so to assist the researchers. Library and information science (LIS) students send most questionnaires that are received, followed by LIS professionals. Lengthy questionnaires and lack of relevance to their field of specialization are some problems militating against questionnaire completion. LIS professional association and library management should organize workshops for librarians to encourage response, and researchers should consult appropriate literature to improve response rate.
Stella E. Igun
Oghenevwogaga Benson Adogbeji

Study Habits of Postgraduate Students in Selected Nigerian Universities (html)

PDF

November 2007
The paper discusses study and reading habits of postgraduate students in selected Nigerian universities. Two hundred questionnaires were sent to five Nigerian universities. A total of 156 (78%) were returned. Students were asked about time and duration of study, learning styles and methods, materials used, and motivation. The results showed that the students did not see the library as a primary place to study. Students' purposes for study include personal knowledge and skills, and examination preparation.
Akobundu Dike Ugah

Evaluating the Use of University Libraries in Nigeria: A Case Study of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike (html)

PDF

November 2007
This study evaluated the use of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Library, Umudike, Nigeria. The population of the study comprised 1,000 library registered users. A random sample of 200 was selected and administered a questionnaire. There were 154 usable responses. Result showed that a total of 130 (84.5%) used the library on daily basis, 50 (32.5%) came to read library books, and 42 (27.3%) to consult reference materials. Textbooks were the most used reading material and were located by direct approach to the shelves. Assistance was needed in locating reference materials and staff cooperation was rated good by 84 (54.5%).
Stacy Voeller

Privacy Policy Assessment for the Livingston Lord Library at Minnesota State University Moorhead(html)

PDF

November 2007
Libraries are not doing all they should to protect users' privacy. Several sections of the USA PATRIOT Act potentially encroach on this privacy. To preserve intellectual freedom and the flow of information in a democratic society, libraries must adopt privacy policies that tell library users their rights and demonstrate the library's willingness to be held accountable for such protections. The current privacy policy at the Livingston Lord Library at Minnesota State University Moorhead does not take into consideration the various ramifications of the PATRIOT Act because the policy predated the Act by more than 20 years. An updated policy is a recommendation of this study. The study was conducted using research from two previously conducted surveys given to libraries regarding the PATRIOT Act as well as investigating and analyzing 30 library privacy policies posted on their academic library web sites. In developing this proposed privacy policy, guidelines and recommendations from the American Library Association were used whenever possible. Results indicate that while libraries and librarians think the right to privacy is important, librarians do not have the time, the understanding, or the means to involve themselves in a complete privacy audit of their library.
Christopher Nkiko
‘Niran Adetoro

Pioneer Bachelor Degree: Citation Analysis of Covenant University Students' Research Projects (html)

PDF

November 2007
The paper reports a citation analysis of the pioneer Covenant University bachelor degree students' research project reports of 2006, accepted by the university academic departments and submitted to the university library. The analysis was performed to help the library determine which materials that are most sought after and used by students. 557 research reports were analyzed, which generated a total of 14,655 citations, an average of 26.3 citations per research report. The type of material cited, number of Internet/electronic resource citations, and recency of citations were analyzed. The result corroborated the findings of citation analyses from the literature. Books (53.3%) were cited more frequently than journals (21.5%). About 64% of the total citations were to recent material.
Gboyega Adio
A. Modupe Akewukereke
Samual Olukayode Ibitoye

The Effect of Medical Libraries on Medical Education: Evidence from Osun State, Nigeria (html)

PDF

October 2007
The study assesses the affect of medical libraries on medical education. It explains vividly, the various constituents connected with value and effectiveness of information to medical practitioners, what to do and what doing them will mean in qualitative terms. In carrying out the research, a survey was conducted through the use of a self developed 24-item questionnaire which tried to improve ways of accessing, assessing and communicating information effectively through strategic planning, statistical measurement, personnel appraisal and budgeting. The finding revealed that medical libraries are playing relevant and statutory roles in their various institutions. This is in spite of the fact that, the libraries are yet to be adequately equipped. At the end of the write-up, recommendations were made on how to improve the value of library services, increase efficiency and promote effectiveness.
Zheng Ye (Lan) Yang
Brenda White

The Evaluation of a Diversity Program at an Academic Library (html)

PDF

October 2007
This article describes recent diversity programming at Texas A&M University Libraries, and the evaluation of that programming. The Libraries created a Public Relations Associate for Diversity Programs and Events Coordinator position, who works with a Diversity Program Coordinating Committee. The coordinator and committee worked to meet diversity goals in communication, coordination, and celebration. They surveyed Libraries' faculty and staff on the impact of diversity programming. Most favorable programming included panel discussions by international students and by Libraries staff members with disabilities. The survey results have identified strengths and weaknesses in the program as well as suggestions for future programming.
Akobundu Dike Ugah

A SWOT Analysis of the University Library of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Library, Umudike, Nigeria (html)

PDF

October 2007
The Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, which began in 1993, is located at Umudike, Ikwuano Local Government Area, Abia State, Nigeria. In addition to many undergraduate programmes, the university set up a postgraduate school in January 1997. In addition to the traditional tripartite mission of universities – teaching, research, and community service, the University of Agriculture Umudike has adopted “training” as a fourth mission, to ensure that its products can go from “Lab to Land.” The University commits it self to the production of educated farmers, the conduct of multi-disciplinary and relevant organized research, and the systematic propagation of new and improved agricultural protocols. This article analyzes the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) faced by the university library, and makes recommendations to the library administration and the university.
James Hooks
Carl Rahkonen
Chris Clouser
Kelly Heider
Rena Fowler

Information Literacy for Branch Campuses and Branch Libraries (html)

PDF

October 2007
Although information literacy objectives are a constant, teaching methods and pedagogy must be structured differently in different teaching-learning environments. The Libraries of Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) created a new model of library instruction for its branch libraries and branch campuses, based on the embedded or college librarian model. Librarians for music, science, education, and the IUP Northpointe campus have been integrated into the instruction and curricular activities of those locations, some of which include distance education programs. While this model has logistical and political challenges, it has proved beneficial in improving information literacy for both faculty and students, and for providing visibility, opportunities, and recognition for library faculty.
David E. Woolwine

Libraries and the Balance of Liberty and Security (html)

PDF

September 2007
The USA Patriot Act has presented librarians with the dilemma of balancing national security against the freedom of access to information and the protection of confidentiality of library records. The paper examines forms of argumentation put forth by the American Library Association in its defense of access and confidentiality rights. It finds that utilitarianism and rights discourse are the most dominant forms of ethical reasoning in the ALA and suggests that these might be replaced or supplemented by other forms of reasoning. Modernist notions as well as postmodernist views are explored and a synthesis of the two positions is offered. Confidentiality/privacy and access to information are necessary for a public dialogue that seeks not only consensus truths but is itself constitutive of the types of autonomous selves Americans are and value.
Bulu Maharana
Champeswar Mishra

A Survey of Digital Information Literacy of Faculty at Sambalpur University (html)

PDF

August 2007
Information now plays a vital part in the lives of individuals, organizations, and institutions, and information literacy is the key to the optimum use of information. Digital media pose new challenges for individuals in collecting, organizing, accessing, evaluating, and using it. This survey presents the results of a survey of faculty, who were asked about their use of digital resources and their knowledge of searching for and evaluating these resources.
Andrew Ogheneruemu
Pereware Aghwotu Tiemo

Evaluation of the Practicum Trainee Librarians at Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria (html)

PDF

August 2007
Trainee librarians at Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria, were surveyed about their library practicum experience. A questionnaire and observation elicited information to find out if the Industrial Training Programme has bridged the existing gap between theory and practice in librarianship. The population of the study were all the 17 trainee librarians and 12 out of the 19 practicing librarians were randomly sampled for a better representative of the population understudy. The major questions were put into table and they were analyzed accordingly.The trainee librarians made suggestions and recommendations for the improvement of the programme. The article makes further recommendations for improvement.
Md. Shariful Islam
Md. Nazmul Islam

Use of ICT in Libraries: An Empirical Study of Selected Libraries in Bangladesh (html)

PDF

August 2007
Bangladesh began to adopt information technology in 1964, but library automation is still in its infancy. The results of a survey of nine libraries and information centers in Bangladesh are presented. Public and private universities and research organizations were surveyed to determine the extent of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Recommendations for solving problems associated with the implementation of ICT are included.
Ioanna Arvaniti
Argyris Kyridis
Konstantinos Dinas

Greek Primary School Teachers Dream of the Ideal School Library (html)

PDF

August 2007
School libraries have been the subject of a number of regulations since the establishment of the Greek nation, but school libraries have never been treated as an essential feature of educational programmes. They lack space, funds and equipment. Moreover, teachers are not aware of their role and services in contemporary schools. This article reports on a study that analyzed written texts produced by primary school teachers, discussing the function, role, and potential of school libraries. The teachers participating in the research described the ideal library, which is quite different from the reality in primary schools.
Amin Yousefi
Shima Yousefi

Metadata: A New Word for an Old Concept(html)

PDF

August 2007
Metadata is a relatively new word for a concept with an long history. This article takes a general look at metadata as a means of cataloging electronic resources. Various definitions and types of metadata are presented and interpreted. Terms related to metadata are illustrated and some major metadata projects such as Dublin Core are discussed. Finally, some problems of metadata development are mentioned.

Christina Ndedde Udoumoh

Clara Chinyere Okoro

The Effect of Library Policies on Overdue Materials in University Libraries in Southern Nigeria (html)

PDF

August 2007
This study sets out to examine the extent to which library policies influences book overdue in university libraries in Nigeria . The study used a survey research design and a researcher made questionnaire as an instrument. Three universities were used for the study. 1000 registered library users comprising 800 students and 200 lecturers were used as sample for the study. One null hypothesis was formulated and tested using t-test analysis. The study concludes that in libraries, books are collected for use, kept for use and served for use. The endless technical processes and routine are all carried on only for use.

John Buschman

F. William Chickering

A Rough Measure of Copy Cataloging Productivity in the Academic Library

PDF

July 2007
A benchmark for copy cataloging productivity at a medium-sized academic library was developed in response to management challenges. We posited that too many details have obscured an informative rough productivity benchmark after reviewing local results. Data reviewed in the aggregate over time measured against hours worked produced comparable results in three larger studies.

Debra J. Pearson

Nancy J. Busch

Nebraska's Library Depository Retrieval Facility (html)

PDF

June 2007
High-density storage of library materials, while becoming more commonplace, is still uncharted territory for many academic libraries. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries undertook the challenge of planning, construction and implementation of a Library Depository and Retrieval Facility (LDRF) as a preservation and money-saving solution for expanding collections and decreased funding. The project was a library-system wide undertaking, with project management being the chosen method of organizational structure and process. This article describes the process in several phases, from initial discussions through development of a program statement, funding, planning, construction, load-in, and operations. The discussion will provide those considering a similar project at their institutions with an overview and a practical guide to the process.
Shilpa Shanbhag

Door-in-the-face: Understandings of Scholarship for Academic Instruction Librarians (html)

PDF

June 2007
As academic librarians, we prescribe an intellectual framework to students by referring to the ‘family of termsscholar-scholarly-scholarship' and by touching upon the mechanics of peer-review in our instruction. While there are rich and varied perceptions of scholarship underlying information literacy literature, there have been no reports of attempts to make them visible to students. In this article I present the door-in-the-face technique to enable instruction librarians to reflect on the ideals of scholarship underlying instruction. In psychology, the door-in-the-face technique is a method of persuasion whereby asking a big outrageous request to be rejected and following it with a smaller reasonable one, increases the chance of the smaller request being accepted and complied with. Getting a handle on the slippery value of scholarship requires us to ask complex questions about the meaning of the framework of scholarship, the values it prescribes, and students' personal beliefs about knowledge followed by practical questions about our own qualitative understanding of scholarship.
Samantha Hypatia Thompson
Ambrose A . Thompson

Skeptical Medical Reference: Helping Patrons Find Critical Resources for Consumer Health Issues (html)

PDF

June 2007
With the popularization of the Internet, there has been a vast proliferation of consumer health material available to the public. Unfortunately, this has only accelerated a pre-existing trend- the fact that much of the material made available is unproven, unreliable, or outright fraud. This requires librarians to make a choice: are they passive and uncritical dispensers of information or are they critical educators who help patrons choose the best information available? In this article we examine the issues facing librarians in this matter and presents skeptical materials that may help librarians to answer critical health questions.
Isabella Idomu Awale-Ale

Faculty-Librarian Collaboration on Developing Reading Skills in Tertiary Institutions (html)

PDF

June 2007
A quiet revolution is taking place in the Nigerian higher education system. Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), prevailing unemployment, and competition by graduates for limited employment spaces are forcing faculty to rethink the curriculum in most academic disciplines, in terms of content and teaching for functional education and nation building. This paper looks at higher education in Nigeria and the role of academic librarians as partners in promoting skills for entrepreneurial education in Nigeria. It reviews the state of ICT in some Nigerian universities and hindrances to the effective use of university libraries in Nigeria for instructional purposes. The paper concludes that librarians have the challenge to aid in effectively and successfully incorporating reading skills into the academic curriculum for entrepreneurial education.
Amrita Madray

Developing Students' Awareness of Plagiarism: Crisis and Opportunities (html)

PDF

June 2007
Plagiarism is an important issue for higher education. Research shows that college students do not always understand the the process of research and writing. This misapprehension of the research and writing process can lead students to plagiarize without intending to do so. The library can be a leader in raising students' awareness, and can partner with teaching departments in developing ways to educate students about plagiarism. This study examines students' understanding of plagiarism as it relates to their ability to write research papers. Freshmen were given a pre-test, followed by instruction on plagiarism and how to avoid it, and then given a post-test. The results demonstrated that students benefited significantly from their instruction. The article also offers practical teaching strategies for plagiarism awareness.
John J. Doherty

No Shhing: Giving Voice to the Silenced: An Essay in Support of Critical Information Literacy (html)

PDF

June 2007
The Information Literacy agenda of academic libraries has recently been critically examined to uncover some of its inherent problems. This paper frames these discussions in the critical theoretical perspective present in educational research, suggesting that the emergence of critical information literacy is long overdue and in need of serious examination by library practitioners who wish to empower student learning.

Felix Chu

Bridging the LIS-Practitioner Gap: Some Frames for Research (html)

PDF

June 2007
There is a divide between published research from library school (LIS) faculty and the use of these publications by practitioners in the field. This article suggests ways to bridge the gap between theory and practice. The suggestions are ways to frame the analyses of useful research areas that can help us improve the practice of librarianship. The first two, structural secrecy and improvisation, are operational in nature and deal with the day-to-day procedures. The third, naturalistic decision making, concerns making choices in the performance of duties. The fourth area, tacit knowledge, is the assumptions rooted in our knowledge of professional and institutional values. The fifth topic, activity theory, may elicit a holistic examination of our activities to study, for example, the efficacy of specific reference practices within the context of a particular library and institution. The final topic is assessment, which helps us decide if we are doing the right things, and, if so, doing them well.

Mariana Regalado

Jill Cirasella

Editorial: Shape Shifters: Librarians Evolve Yet Again in the Age of Google (html)

PDF

June 2007
Jennifer Lang

"Have You Searched Google Yet?" Using Google as a Discovery Tool for Cataloging (html)

PDF

June 2007
This paper demonstrates how some of Google's search functionalities can be used to locate information to assist in the cataloging process. In addition, the results of an informal survey of catalogers shows that while some respondents never considered using Google or prefer different methods for finding information, others find Google to be a good supplement to "traditional" cataloging tools.
Wei Fang

Using Google Analytics for Improving Library Website Content and Design: A Case Study (html)

PDF

June 2007
Google Analytics is a free web analytics solution that provides webmasters with insightful information about how visitors find and interact with their websites. In this case study, we have experimented in using Google Analytics to analyze two of our websites: The Rutgers-Newark Law Library main website and The New Jersey Digital Legal Library website. It was used to monitor our visitors' browsing activities and viewing behaviors for three months. Based on our findings from Google Analytics reports, we have redesigned our website. Subsequent data collected by Google Analytics have confirmed that our new design better fits the information needs of our visitors and librarians. Google Analytics is very powerful and can be used for almost any website. We believe that other libraries will benefit from using Google Analytics as well. Limitations of Google Analytics are also discussed based on our experience with it.
Jill Cirasella

You and Me and Google Makes Three: Welcoming Google into the Reference Interview (html)

PDF

June 2007
Library patrons often approach the reference desk with indirect, incomplete, or misleading questions, known as "ill-formed" questions. Transforming ill-formed questions into well-formed ones is a crucial part of the reference interview, and Google can be an active participant in that process. This paper discusses how Google can help librarians and patrons deal with incomplete citations, incorrect citations, incorrect spellings, tip-of-the-tongue questions, and forgotten searches.
Beth Posner

Library Resource Sharing in the Early Age of Google (html)

PDF

June 2007
Library information resource sharing has traditionally been organized around the physical transfer of loans and copies from one location to another. Such interlibrary loan activities have become successively easier and more efficient because of the use of various technologies. Some of the latest and most successful of these include various web-based information services, such as Google, which help to facilitate both physical delivery and online access to information resources. The challenge now facing ILL librarians is to evaluate how to best incorporate these services into their existing operations and to determine whether these constitute additional ways to help patrons access information or whether they represent a paradigmatic alternative to traditional library-based information resource sharing.
Lori Bowen Ayre

Library Delivery 2.0: Delivering Library Materials in the Age of NetFlix (html)

PDF

June 2007
This article discusses how Netflix and similar services are shaping expectations about product delivery, which in turn are driving libraries to rethink how items are delivered to their patrons. Library Delivery 2.0 refers to the idea of delivering library materials into the user's hands in a way that is personalized, convenient, and fast. Library Delivery 2.0 builds on the concept of Library 2.0, a new model of library service that operates according to the expectations of today's library users. Library Delivery 2.0 is a new model of library delivery service that operates according to the expectations of today's users. In this vision, the library delivers information wherever and whenever the user requires it and in whatever format the user needs it.

Angi Faiks

Amy Radermacher

Amy Sheehan

WhatAbout the Book? Google-izing the Catalog with Tables of Contents(html)

PDF

June 2007
One of the many ways to meet the challenge of offering users a better search experience—and to continue the library's existence as a “growing organism” (Ranganathan)—in the current information atmosphere is to provide more text to search against, just as Google's Book Search does. One method for achieving this is to add tables of contents (TOC) and summary notes into a catalog's bibliographic records for books, thereby offering additional, highly relevant search terms into a library's database. While adding access points is not a new notion, libraries can start to meet users' expectations by providing them with more information about the books included in library catalogs. This paper explains how the addition of tables of contents (and some summary notes) to a library consortium's local catalog provided positive results, especially when weighed against the costs of incorporating them into the catalog. 
Carol Ottolenghi

Google 'til They Goggle: Trawling Electronic Databases to Build Your Collection and Better Serve Your Client Base (html)

PDF

June 2007
Too often, organizations and the public consider properly trained Library staff as “overhead,” or even "dead weight." Budget crunches and the “I’ll just Google it” attitude prevalent today can mean a shrinking – or completely eliminated – library. This paper discusses how the Library staff at the Ohio Attorney General’s Office paired the power of traditional librarian skills with Google, electronic data bases, and a variety of online “alert” systems for greatly increased outreach, effectiveness, and visibility within their organization.

Lee David Jaffe

Greg Careaga

Standing Up for Open Source (html)

PDF

June 2007
The open source movement is a vital and innovative challenger to commercial channels for software and publishing. Interests and values shared between libraries and open source communities, along with significant functional advantages to the open source model, should lead librarians to adopt open source tools and become more engaged with open source developers and their projects. Instead, there is a significant gap between the potential of open source and the adoption of these tools in libraries. The authors address the causes and potential consequences, and suggest strategies that can be adopted by advocates for open source in libraries.
Genevieve Williams

Unclear on the Context: Refocusing on Information Literacy's Evaluative Component in the Age of Google (html)

PDF

June 2007
In an era of information decontextualization, the evaluative component of information literacy is more important than ever. College students believe themselves to be expert researchers, due to their familiarity with Google; yet they also value the library and know to be critical about information resources. Previous theoretical work, including Marcia Bates's "berrypicking" model and Christine Pawley's analysis of the discourse of information literacy, provides a ground for developing a proactive response to the age of Google. Far from being made redundant by ease of access to information, our task of developing information literacy in college students is more critical than ever.
Mariana Regalado

Research Authority in the Age of Google: Equilibrium Sought (html)

PDF

June 2007
The development of the web caused a major shift in the relationship of students, instructors, and librarians to information. Students gained newfound authority as savvy, experienced users of technology, and the web in particular. Students often perceived any results as search success. Librarians' role as gate-keepers to information is more vital than ever. Though the academic value of user-authenticated information is still a topic of some debate, there is a growing acceptance of these resources. Academic librarians in particular serve as the counterweight in the new research equilibrium. Librarians continue to do what they have long done, that is, provide a meaningful context for research and provide a kind of nuanced, empathetic, thoughtful help no online search tool can provide.
Steven Ovadia

Digg.com and Socially Driven Authority(html)

PDF

June 2007
For years, librarians have been able to distill the notion of authority, in its purest form, to two simple questions: Who said it? and Under whose auspices? Now, as more content migrates online, understanding authority is a more complex process. Social news sites, like Digg.com allow these traditional authority structures to be bypassed, creating a new, socially-driven authority, based upon an author expertise that is not necessarily recognized by academia. In order for researchers, especially student researchers, to evaluate these sources, they must learn to construct their own authority.
JoEllen Broome

The View from an Elder: Closing Essay (html)

PDF

June 2007
The author explores the shapeshifting of Wart, the young King Arthur in T.H. White'sThe Once and Future King, as a metaphor for professional and personal transformation as a librarian. The shape shift has been an attitude shift, a mental reshaping, of a librarian come lately to the field. Concerns about the staying power of new technology coexist with the magical gift of connection from tools like Google.
Adeyinka Tella
C. O. Ayeni
S. O. Popoola

Work Motivation, Job Satisfaction, and Organisational Commitment of Library Personnel in Academic and Research Libraries in Oyo State, Nigeria (html)

PDF

April 2007
A well-managed organization sees employees as the source of quality and productivity. This study examines the perception of work motivation in relation to job satisfaction and organizational commitment of library personnel in academic and research libraries in Oyo state, Nigeria. Two hundred library personnel (41% female, 59% male) were selected through a total enumeration sampling from five research and four academic libraries. A questionnaire called Work Motivation, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment Scale (WMJSCS) with the overall co-efficient of r = 0.83 cronbach alpha was adapted from Organization Commitment Questionnaire by Mooday et al. (1979), Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire by Weiss, 1967, and Motivation Behaviour Scale of Akinboye, 2001. The Executive Behaviour Battery was used for data gathering. Four research questions were developed and analyzed using multiple correlation/classification, multiple regression, and t-test statistical tools. The result indicates that both job satisfaction and commitment correlate with perception of work motivation by library workers. No significant difference exists in the perception of work motivation of professional and non-professional library personnel. Employees in academic libraries and research libraries have the same level of job satisfaction. Years of experience have no relationship with commitment.

Felicia A. Smith

Games for Teaching Information Literacy Skills (html)

PDF

April 2007
A didactic approach to teaching database research skills has proven to be dreadfully dull and ineffective for many students. One possible solution to this problem is to incorporate educational games with predetermined learning objectives into the curriculum. Chemistry/Biochemistry majors at the University of Notre Dame take a required information literacy skills course that introduces chemistry database search techniques. The course features several databases – highlighting the distinct nuances of each database and the different search strategies required to access information. This paper describes active learning activities as a method for creating a higher level of engagement while maintaining the objectives of a traditional course format.
S. Chiemeke
O. B. Longe
S.S. Umar
I.O. Shaib

Users' Perceptions of the Use of Academic Libraries and Online Facilities for Research Purposes in Nigeria(html)

PDF

April 2007

The migration from print to digital media for the storage, retrieval, and communication of all types of data has influenced the way people source for research materials. A questionnaire was administered to evaluate users' views of the use of libraries and online resources for research. Hypotheses tested using chi square to at the 0.05 level of significance revealed that there is no perceived significant difference in staff efficiency and ease of use of facilities in academic libraries and the online environment. However, there is a significant difference in users' perception of speed of access to needed research materials, availability of current materials, cost of access, and distractions within the facilities. Recommendations were made based on the research findings.

Parker-Gibson, Necia

Library Mentoring and Management for Scholarship (html)

PDF

March 2007
Abstract: Discusses strategies for managers supporting new academic librarians in their pursuit of scholarship. Advice includes types of support that are worthwhile, including collegiality, communication, conference travel, the need for active, positive recognition and the pivotal role of office space. The article draws from interdisciplinary sources in the literature and personal experience in interviewing, hiring, writing, editing and mentoring.
Esharenana E. Adomi

Student Expectations of Faculty in a Nigerian LIS School (html)

PDF

March 2007

Abstract: Final year undergraduate students of the Department of Library and Information Science, Delta State University, Abraka Nigeria were surveyed and asked to list five qualities they would like their lecturers to possess. The responses were analyzed using frequency counts and percentage. Results reveal that students would like their lecturers to be knowledgeable in the courses they are teaching, to be punctual, to be able to impart knowledge, to assess students objectively and possess ICT knowledge and skills. Lecturers should strive to have deep knowledge of the courses they are teaching and also employ relevant methods to deliver lectures. A code of conduct should be developed by relevant LIS authorities to guide lecturers.

Ima – M. P. Usoro
Eboro E.Usanga

The Role of Nigerian Primary School Libraries in Literacy and Lifelong Learning (html)

PDF

March 2007

Abstract: This paper examines the importance of primary school libraries in enhancing literacy and preparing students for lifelong learning. The role of school libraries in helping carry out the goals of education and in facilitating lifelong learning are discussed. The librarian or trained library staff are the key to good library service. The role of government in encouraging school libraries is also emphasized.

Suresh K Chauhan
Prem Chand

UGC-Infonet: E-Journals Consortium and Indian Academics: The Right Initiative at the Right Time (html)

PDF

February 2007

Abstract: UGC: Infonet: E-Journals Consortium is the one amongst the foremost programmes launched by University Grants Commission (UGC), India for the free flow of scholarly information between the Indian universities. It is a new phase for the higher educational system of the country in which peer-reviewed literature from all across the world is being given to the academic and research community. The programme is fully funded by UGC and being monitored and executed by Information and Library Network (INFLIBNET) Centre. INFLIBNET has taken various steps to make exhaustive and comprehensive usage of provided e-resources, by the member universities. The Centre has also conducted various seminars, conferences, training and awareness programmes to make the end user aware about the benefits and use of e-resources in terms of information search, browse and download. In the sequence of various programmes, 5 national seminars were also conducted in different regions of the country. In these seminars a well-designed questionnaire was circulated, to know the awareness level of the users about the UGC-Infonet initiative. Through this paper an attempt is made to analyze the feedback given by the user and valuable suggestions and ambiguities are also observed

Gabriela Sonntag
Felicia Palsson

No Longer the Sacred Cow – No Longer a Desk: Transforming Reference Service to Meet 21st Century User Needs (html)

PDF

February 2007

Abstract: The reference desk is no longer an essential component of the work of academic librarians. Instruction programs are becoming stronger and more pervasive; librarians are increasing their contact with students and faculty in course-related interactions. We recognize that Google has become the primary resource for quick reference answers with students, faculty and with librarians. Students are indeed becoming more independent, as evidenced by declining reference statistics across the nation. But how are students' research needs met? Are we abandoning them altogether? At the California State University San Marcos, reference services with strong ties to the Information Literacy Program incorporate technology as well as traditional face-to-face assistance. A new reference model ensures that students find the most appropriate research assistance in a more timely fashion than the reference desk could ever provide.

I V Malhan
Shivarama Rao

Agricultural Knowledge Transfer in India: a Study of Prevailing Communication Channels (html)

PDF

February 2007

Abstract: The nature of agricultural research institutions and activities considerably influence the agriculture information sector in India. This paper describes the development of the agricultural sector in India and provides a comprehensive review of channels of agricultural knowledge transfer in India, including community projects, extension services, government initiatives, agriclinics, networks, and the role of non-governmental organizations and libraries. The paper concludes with the need for integration and consolidation of existing efforts for knowledge transfer from lab to land, and highlights the requirement of setting up a universal agricultural digital library, including content on all areas of agriculture.

Daniel O. Akparobore

Survey of the Organization of Resources of the Delta State University Library, Abraka (html)

PDF

January 2007

Abstract: Describes a survey of the organization of library resources Delta State University Library, Abraka, Nigeria. Thirty-five professional and paraprofessional staffed completed a questionnaire and interviews. While the results of the study revealed adequate expertise among staff in areas such as cataloging, infrastructure such as computers and other equipment are severely lacking.

Blessing Amina AkporhonorEnemute Basil Iwhiwhu

The Management of Staff Records at Delta State University Library, Abraka, Nigeria (html)

PDF

January 2007

Abstract: This paper describes records management practice for personnel files at Delta State University Library, Abraka, Nigeria. Data were collected through interview and observation. Manual filling systems such as registers are used for staff records, and most files are too voluminous. There is a space constraint due to the lack of a retention and disposal schedule and the lack of a computer system. It is recommended that the staff responsible for the files undergo records management training programmes or that a diploma holder in records management with computer knowledge be employed, and that records should be computerized.

Josiah Oghenero Ruteyan
Blessing Amina Akporhonor

An Assessment of the Reference Collection and Services of Four Academic Libraries in Nigeria (html)

PDF

January 2007

Abstract: The paper looks at the reference collection and reference services in four academic libraries in Nigeria. All four libraries have a section or wing known as the reference section, all have similar reference collections and criteria for collection development in that section, and all have similar services.

Wayne Bivens-Tatum

The Virtue of Reference (html)

PDF

January 2007

Abstract: Reference work is neither an art nor a science. Its motivating virtue is indeed an intellectual virtue, but the one most difficult to teach: what Aristotle calledphronesis, which is usually translated as prudence or practical wisdom. Reference is a phronetic activity. The concept of "virtue ethics," and Aristotle's views on virtue are applied to library reference, and applied to being a reference librarian.

LPP home

contact us