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LPP Special Issue: Libraries and Google

Guest Editors:

Mariana Regalado

Jill Cirasella

Brooklyn College Library
2900 Bedford Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11210-2889

Mariana Regalado

Jill Cirasella

Editorial: Shape Shifters: Librarians Evolve Yet Again in the Age of Google (html)

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June 2007
Jennifer Lang

"Have You Searched Google Yet?" Using Google as a Discovery Tool for Cataloging (html)

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June 2007
This paper demonstrates how some of Google's search functionalities can be used to locate information to assist in the cataloging process. In addition, the results of an informal survey of catalogers shows that while some respondents never considered using Google or prefer different methods for finding information, others find Google to be a good supplement to "traditional" cataloging tools.
Wei Fang

Using Google Analytics for Improving Library Website Content and Design: A Case Study (html)

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June 2007
Google Analytics is a free web analytics solution that provides webmasters with insightful information about how visitors find and interact with their websites. In this case study, we have experimented in using Google Analytics to analyze two of our websites: The Rutgers-Newark Law Library main website and The New Jersey Digital Legal Library website. It was used to monitor our visitors' browsing activities and viewing behaviors for three months. Based on our findings from Google Analytics reports, we have redesigned our website. Subsequent data collected by Google Analytics have confirmed that our new design better fits the information needs of our visitors and librarians. Google Analytics is very powerful and can be used for almost any website. We believe that other libraries will benefit from using Google Analytics as well. Limitations of Google Analytics are also discussed based on our experience with it.
Jill Cirasella

You and Me and Google Makes Three: Welcoming Google into the Reference Interview (html)

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June 2007
Library patrons often approach the reference desk with indirect, incomplete, or misleading questions, known as "ill-formed" questions. Transforming ill-formed questions into well-formed ones is a crucial part of the reference interview, and Google can be an active participant in that process. This paper discusses how Google can help librarians and patrons deal with incomplete citations, incorrect citations, incorrect spellings, tip-of-the-tongue questions, and forgotten searches.
Beth Posner

Library Resource Sharing in the Early Age of Google (html)

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June 2007
Library information resource sharing has traditionally been organized around the physical transfer of loans and copies from one location to another. Such interlibrary loan activities have become successively easier and more efficient because of the use of various technologies. Some of the latest and most successful of these include various web-based information services, such as Google, which help to facilitate both physical delivery and online access to information resources. The challenge now facing ILL librarians is to evaluate how to best incorporate these services into their existing operations and to determine whether these constitute additional ways to help patrons access information or whether they represent a paradigmatic alternative to traditional library-based information resource sharing.
Lori Bowen Ayre

Library Delivery 2.0: Delivering Library Materials in the Age of NetFlix (html)

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June 2007
This article discusses how Netflix and similar services are shaping expectations about product delivery, which in turn are driving libraries to rethink how items are delivered to their patrons. Library Delivery 2.0 refers to the idea of delivering library materials into the user's hands in a way that is personalized, convenient, and fast. Library Delivery 2.0 builds on the concept of Library 2.0, a new model of library service that operates according to the expectations of today's library users. Library Delivery 2.0 is a new model of library delivery service that operates according to the expectations of today's users. In this vision, the library delivers information wherever and whenever the user requires it and in whatever format the user needs it.

Angi Faiks

Amy Radermacher

Amy Sheehan

WhatAbout the Book? Google-izing the Catalog with Tables of Contents(html)

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June 2007
One of the many ways to meet the challenge of offering users a better search experience—and to continue the library's existence as a “growing organism” (Ranganathan)—in the current information atmosphere is to provide more text to search against, just as Google's Book Search does. One method for achieving this is to add tables of contents (TOC) and summary notes into a catalog's bibliographic records for books, thereby offering additional, highly relevant search terms into a library's database. While adding access points is not a new notion, libraries can start to meet users' expectations by providing them with more information about the books included in library catalogs. This paper explains how the addition of tables of contents (and some summary notes) to a library consortium's local catalog provided positive results, especially when weighed against the costs of incorporating them into the catalog. 
Carol Ottolenghi

Google 'til They Goggle: Trawling Electronic Databases to Build Your Collection and Better Serve Your Client Base (html)

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June 2007
Too often, organizations and the public consider properly trained Library staff as “overhead,” or even "dead weight." Budget crunches and the “I’ll just Google it” attitude prevalent today can mean a shrinking – or completely eliminated – library. This paper discusses how the Library staff at the Ohio Attorney General’s Office paired the power of traditional librarian skills with Google, electronic data bases, and a variety of online “alert” systems for greatly increased outreach, effectiveness, and visibility within their organization.

Lee David Jaffe

Greg Careaga

Standing Up for Open Source (html)

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June 2007
The open source movement is a vital and innovative challenger to commercial channels for software and publishing. Interests and values shared between libraries and open source communities, along with significant functional advantages to the open source model, should lead librarians to adopt open source tools and become more engaged with open source developers and their projects. Instead, there is a significant gap between the potential of open source and the adoption of these tools in libraries. The authors address the causes and potential consequences, and suggest strategies that can be adopted by advocates for open source in libraries.
Genevieve Williams

Unclear on the Context: Refocusing on Information Literacy's Evaluative Component in the Age of Google (html)

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June 2007
In an era of information decontextualization, the evaluative component of information literacy is more important than ever. College students believe themselves to be expert researchers, due to their familiarity with Google; yet they also value the library and know to be critical about information resources. Previous theoretical work, including Marcia Bates's "berrypicking" model and Christine Pawley's analysis of the discourse of information literacy, provides a ground for developing a proactive response to the age of Google. Far from being made redundant by ease of access to information, our task of developing information literacy in college students is more critical than ever.
Mariana Regalado

Research Authority in the Age of Google: Equilibrium Sought (html)

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June 2007
The development of the web caused a major shift in the relationship of students, instructors, and librarians to information. Students gained newfound authority as savvy, experienced users of technology, and the web in particular. Students often perceived any results as search success. Librarians' role as gate-keepers to information is more vital than ever. Though the academic value of user-authenticated information is still a topic of some debate, there is a growing acceptance of these resources. Academic librarians in particular serve as the counterweight in the new research equilibrium. Librarians continue to do what they have long done, that is, provide a meaningful context for research and provide a kind of nuanced, empathetic, thoughtful help no online search tool can provide.
Steven Ovadia

Digg.com and Socially Driven Authority(html)

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June 2007
For years, librarians have been able to distill the notion of authority, in its purest form, to two simple questions: Who said it? and Under whose auspices? Now, as more content migrates online, understanding authority is a more complex process. Social news sites, like Digg.com allow these traditional authority structures to be bypassed, creating a new, socially-driven authority, based upon an author expertise that is not necessarily recognized by academia. In order for researchers, especially student researchers, to evaluate these sources, they must learn to construct their own authority.
JoEllen Broome

The View from an Elder: Closing Essay (html)

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June 2007
The author explores the shapeshifting of Wart, the young King Arthur in T.H. White'sThe Once and Future King, as a metaphor for professional and personal transformation as a librarian. The shape shift has been an attitude shift, a mental reshaping, of a librarian come lately to the field. Concerns about the staying power of new technology coexist with the magical gift of connection from tools like Google.

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