= The Evil Deceiver Argument =

 

[pp. 20-22]

 

P1.       Either there is a god or there is not.

 

P2.       If there is a god, it is possible that he is a deceiver.

 

P3.       If he is a deceiver, then we could be wrong about our beliefs concerning science and mathematics, i.e., what we consider most certain.

 

4.         Thus, if there is a god, then it is possible that our beliefs about science and mathematics could be false.

 

P5.       If they could be false, we must doubt them.

 

6.         If there is a god, we must doubt those beliefs.

 

P7.       If there is no god, then chance rules.

 

P8.       If chance rules, it is even more possible that our beliefs about science and mathematics could be false.

 

9.         If there is no god, we must doubt those beliefs.

 

P10.     Skeptical Method:  If there is a doubt, throw it out.

 

 

C.        We must reject the dictates of our intellect (i.e., beliefs about science and mathematics) as false.