[to be updated]Dear "Freshmen" and first-term sophomore advisees English majors (see also further below for advice to prospective majors),

Please reply by email to sflores@uidaho.edu to begin the advising process, and include a list of current coursework and a provisional schedule for next semester, along with any questions you may have. If you would like to meet with me, I can meet with you in Room 315 Idaho Commons. PLEASE REVIEW THE FOLLOWING LONG MEMO OF INFORMATION AND ADVICE (directed primarily to new freshmen rather than continuing first-semester sophomores) before we discuss your schedule. I look forward to talking with you about your plans, and about the major. Be sure to follow this memo down to its end, including the latest catalog requirements for the various emphases in the English major.

Dr. Stephan Flores (sflores@uidaho.edu) --- Please see these URLs for the registration information/advice:
English Undergraduate Curricular Requirements [UI 2010-2011 Catalog]:
http://www.uiweb.uidaho.edu/schedule/catalog/2010/english-undergraduate-curricular-requirements.htm

See section J in UI Catalog for General Education core requirements:
http://www.uiweb.uidaho.edu/schedule/catalog/2010/general-requirements-and-academic-procedures.htm#o4847

and see this section for College of Letters, Arts and Sciences reqs for graduation, including reqs. for the B.A. degree.:
http://www.uiweb.uidaho.edu/schedule/catalog/2010/college-of-letters-arts-and-social-sciences.htm#o9736

UI Center for Academic Advising

http://www.students.uidaho.edu/ (important site for current and prospective students)

UI Core Curriculum Requirements

UI Core Coordinator's Site (includes adviser's guide and more)

AGAIN, TO: First-Year English Majors ("freshmen" not transfer students)

Dear Prospective "Freshmen" Advisees,

My name is Stephan Flores, and as you may know, Tom Drake and I advise first-year English majors (and also first-semester sophomores). I want to offer some information and advice about planning your classes.

Before registration, you must discuss your proposed schedule with an academic advisor, and more generally, confer to explore your interests in English. Before you talk with me, it's helpful if you consult the current UI Catalog to review requirements/links as noted above (notably three credits in Social Science beyond the UI core, plus the foreign language requirement--15-16 credits in same language).

Keep in mind that English 215 is a required course for all emphases in the major.

English 215: Introduction to English Studies (3 cr): The gateway course for all English majors, focusing on goals of and opportunities opened by the various branches of English, the practice of close reading, critical terminology and issue central to English studies, and basic research and writing skills necessary for literary study. Try to take this second semester of your first year, if offered, or fall semester of second year.

English 257 and/or 258 (Literature of Western Civilization I and II) is required in all emphases: you should try to enroll in either class your second (or first) semester, along with English 102 (or Engl 101 if you placed into that class).

If you have not started a foreign language, or arranged to receive credit for a foreign language, you should discuss this with an advisor (esp. someone in Foreign Lang. and Lit.), especially since those who may be prepared to enroll in a foreign language class beyond the first semester, can hope to do well in the class and then petition (see Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures) to receive academic credit (that you must also pay for) for courses earlier in the sequence that they have bypassed (for example, if you complete Spanish 201, you could then seek credits for Spanish 101 and 102).

Remember that because of the foreign language requirement, English majors automatically fulfill the International Course requirement under the requirements for UI General Core Studies . The new UI Core also includes required course work in the following categories: Communication (English 102 plus 2-3 credits--see list of elective choices);Natural and Applied Sciences (7-8 crs); Mathematical, Computer and Statistical Sciences (3 crs).

In sum, your first semester classes, depending on your interests and various placement considerations, might look something like this:

Foreign Language (4-5 credits.)

English 102 or 101 (3crs.)--see placement information that you receive or Time Schedule

Math, Computer Science, or Statistics (3-4 crs.)--see Math placement information in Time Schedule (and some majors simply take Math 123) or via downloadable PDF file/guide OR integrated science (CORS) or lab core science, see below

Core Discovery sequence 100-level (4 crs; spring Core 150-level required as well; note that students can elect to take any second semester Core Discovery Core course, without having completed a Core 100-numbered course. Also, Core Discovery courses number 150 and above are open to sophomores as well as freshmen. See Core Advising Site

English 257 or 258 (Literature of Western Civilization "I" or "II"--could defer to second semester )

OR

[could start these second semester]:Natural and Applied Science (4 crs.) but you are also encouraged to take/consider a new Integrated Science CORS 200-level course (3 crs.)

and you will be enrolled in CORE 100-level and 150-and above level (these interdisciplinary, topic-focused courses offer excellent opportunities to make good progress in the UI core curriculum in the humanities and social sciences).

So shoot for 15-18 credits, keeping in mind your sense of your abilities, academic experience, and study habits. You should try to average 16 or more credits each semester to make good progress toward your degree. Advice for second semester just follows from these basic requirements (note: English 310 is required in the Literature Emphasis, and can be completed during your third or fourth semester. Here's a course description from the new UI catalog: English 310: Literary Theory (3 cr): Current trends and issues in literary theory, with practice in the application of theory to literary to literary texts.

Emphases: Quick observations: Those interested in pursuing graduate study in literature or in earning secondary teaching certification pursue the emphasis in Literature or the Teaching Emphasis, or perhaps the Creative Writing emphasis (in general, a solid number of English majors are in the Creative Writing emphasis); those interested in the most flexible preparation that can accomodate significant coursework in a related field (including a minor or perhaps another major), often choose the Professional Emphasis; for example, an English major with a Professional emphasis might take courses in computer science, business, communication studies, journalism, graphic or visual communication, digital imaging, political science, philosophy, foreign languages--virtually any major of interest. If you decide not to pursue a career in teaching or in graduate study in English, the Professional Emphasis may be attractive, though it also means that you may have a bit less depth in English depending on number of courses completed. Those who decide not to major in English might also consider a Writing Minor, English Minor, or Teaching English as a Second Language Minor as a productive supplement to your major studies (English majors also can pursue a TESL minor). The emphases will be listed on your transcript, and it may be possible to coordinate matters so that if you fulfill the requirements for more than one emphasis, then two emphases, for example, may be noted on your transcript (this has not been determined/finalized).

Finally, take the opportunity when speaking with an advisor to introduce yourself--let us know about your interests in the UI, in English as a major, your tentative career possibilities if you have some in mind, and please ask questions.

For general advising info, see this site: http://www.uidaho.edu/registrar/students) and especially this site: http://www.uidaho.edu/registrar/graduation/audit

VandalWeb allows students and their advisors to check their degree progress at any time.  Students can access their degree audit report under the Student Records/Grades/Degree Audit menu.  If you are seeking two degree programs, there is a drop-down option on the Degree field at the top of the degree audit to make a selection.  There is also a What If option to allow you to explore other degrees and majors.  You can view the Introduction to Degree Audit handout [pdf] for a general overview with tips and tricks for accessing and reading your degree audit.

For undergraduates, the degree audit lists all requirements for their declared major including core, department, and college requirements.  Undergraduate degree audits update automatically with each change of major and at the end of each term after grades are posted.  Declared minors and academic certificates will appear in the degree audit with their requirements.

Upon approval from their academic advisor and department chair (and college, if required), undergraduate students may submit a Degree Audit Substitution/Waiver Request form for alternative degree, major, or minor requirements.

College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences requirements for the B.A. Degree[ these are required of English majors!]:

Humanities. 6 credits (two courses) in addition to the minimum university-wide core requirement in humanities/social sciences. [youll satisfy this automatically as an English major via coursework for the degree]

Social Sciences. 3 credits (one course) in addition to the minimum university-wide core requirement in humanities/social sciences. [for example, English majors in the Teaching Emphasis will take Psych 101 in their first year, and also satisfy this requirement—for other emphases, all kinds of social science courses will work, from Anthropology to Political Science etc.]

Foreign Language. 0-16 credits (zero-four courses), i.e., competence in one foreign language equivalent to that gained by the completion of four semesters of college courses (through the intermediate level). This requirement may be satisfied by the completion of either of the following options: (1) 16 credits or four high-school units in one foreign language, or (2) 12 credits in one foreign language, and one three-credit course in literature translated from the same language. The 12 credits may be satisfied by three high-school units in one foreign language. NOTE: ENGLISH MAJORS ARE ADVISED TO GET STARTED ON A FOREIGN LANGUAGE, AT THE LEVEL APPROPRIATE TO ONES COMPETENCIES, DURING THE FRESHMAN YEAR—SEE FURTHER BELOW FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS, INCLUDING TAKING A MATH/CS/or STAT course in the first year, science gen ed reqs., communication reqs. etc.

English Undergraduate Curricular Requirements 2010-2011 UI Catalog

English (B.A.)

Where specific courses are listed with the area requirements, the department may approve equivalencies.

Prerequisites: Students may enroll for a second-semester course in English without having had the first-semester course, unless it is a stated prerequisite to the second-semester course. Engl 101 and 102 are prerequisite to all upper-division courses. A transfer student who lacks Engl 101 or 102, or both, may take either or both for credit even though he or she has already taken a literature course for which Engl 101 or 102 is prerequisite at UI. For English majors in the Creative Writing and Literature Emphases Engl 215 or permission of instructor is a prerequisite or corequisite to all literature courses numbered 300 and above; for English majors in the Professional and Teaching emphases Engl 175 or 210 [or Engl 215] or permission of the instructor is a prerequisite or co-requisite to all literature courses numbered 300 or above. [Note: in emphases listed below, some notations on typical frequency and semester in which the course is offered have been included—otherwise, most literature and creative writing courses are offered each semester]

Required course work includes the university requirements (see regulation J-3), the general requirements for the B.A. degree, and one of the following emphases:

A. Literature Emphasis [45 credits total]

Foundations (6 cr)

Engl 215

Introduction to English Studies (3 cr) Prereq: Engl 102 or equiv.—seek to take this in fall semester of sophomore year or spring semester of first year, if offered

Engl 310

Literary Theory (3 cr) Prereq: Engl 215

Literary History (15 cr)

Engl 257 or 258

Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)/take either during first 3 semesters (freshman to sophomore year)

Engl 345

Shakespeare or a 400-level course in literature before 1800 (3 cr) [take after having completed Engl 215—note that 345 is typically offered once a year]

One upper-division course in literature before 1900 (3 cr)

Three courses from the following (9 cr):

Engl 341

Survey of British Literature (3 cr)/Fall semester

Engl 342

Survey of British Literature (3 cr)/Spring semester

Engl 343

Survey of American Literature (3 cr)/Fall semester

Engl 344

Survey of American Literature (3 cr)/Spring semester

Linguistics (3 cr)

Engl 441

Introduction to the Study of Language OR

Engl 496

History of the English Language (3 cr)

Cultural Diversity (One course in non-canonical or underrepresented literatures) (3 cr) Note: Engl 485 Global Literatures in English also will be approved to count toward the Cultural Diversity requirement.

Engl 380

Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures (3 cr)

Engl 480

Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr).

Engl 481

Women's Literature (3 cr).

Engl 483

African American Literature (3 cr). Freq. spring semesters

Engl 484

American Indian Literature (3 cr)./fall semester

Or an adviser-approved special topics or extra-departmental course (3 cr)

Electives (12 cr)

Four 400-level courses in literature

Capstone (3 cr)

Engl 490

Senior Seminar (3 cr)—fall or spring semester of senior year

B. Creative Writing Emphasis [45 credits total]

Foundations (3 cr):

Engl 215

Introduction to English Studies (3 cr)/ Prereq: Engl 102 or equiv. —seek to take this in fall semester of sophomore year or spring semester of first year, if offered

Literary History (12 cr):

Engl 257 or 258

Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)/ take either during first 3 semesters (freshman to sophomore year)

Engl 345

Shakespeare or another course in literature before 1800 (3 cr)

Two courses from the following (6 cr):

Engl 341

Survey of British Literature (3 cr)/Fall semester

Engl 342

Survey of British Literature (3 cr)/Spring semester

Engl 343

Survey of American Literature (3 cr)/Fall semester

Engl 344

Survey of American Literature (3 cr)/Spring semester

Genre Craft/Workshop Courses (Students must take a full numerical sequence in their major genre (ex. 291/391/491), plus two additional creative writing courses in a sequence in one other genre for a minor genre and either a beginning writing course in a third genre or an advanced writing course in the minor genre.) (18 cr):

Engl 291

Beginning Poetry Writing (3 cr)

Engl 292

Beginning Fiction Writing (3 cr)

Engl 293

Beginning Nonfiction Writing (3 cr)

Engl 391

Intermediate Poetry Writing (3 cr)

Engl 392

Intermediate Fiction Writing (3 cr)

Engl 393

Intermediate Nonfiction Writing (3 cr)

Engl 491

Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr)

Engl 492

Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr)

Engl 493

Advanced Nonfiction Writing (3 cr)

Cultural Diversity (One course in non-canonical or underrepresented literatures) (3 cr) Note: Engl 485 Global Literatures in English also will be approved to count toward the Cultural Diversity requirement.:

Engl 380

Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures (3 cr)

Engl 480

Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr).

Engl 481

Women's Literature (3 cr).

Engl 483

African American Literature (3 cr).

Engl 484

American Indian Literature (3 cr). Fall semester

Or an adviser-approved special topics or extra-departmental course (3 cr)

Electives (6 cr):

Two literature courses at the 400-level

Capstone (3 cr):

Engl 490

Senior Seminar (3 cr) fall or spring semester of senior year

C. Professional Emphasis [39 credits total]

The professional emphasis is an individualized program for students wishing to stress preparation for professions such as law, writing and editing, government service, and business.

Foundations (3 cr)

Engl 215

Introduction to English Studies (3 cr) Prereq: Engl 102 or equiv. —seek to take this in fall semester of sophomore year or spring semester of first year, if offered

Literary History (9 cr)

Engl 257 or 258

 Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)

Two courses from the following (6 cr):

Engl 341

Survey of British Literature (3 cr) Fall semester

Engl 342

Survey of British Literature (3 cr) Spring semester

Engl 343

Survey of American Literature (3 cr) Fall Semester

Engl 344

Survey of American Literature (3 cr) Spring semeter

Writing (9 cr)

Two courses from the following (6 cr):

Engl 207

Persuasive Writing (3 cr)

Engl 208

Personal and Exploratory Writing (3 cr)

Engl 209

Inquiry-Based Writing (3 cr)

Engl 309

Advanced Prose Writing (3 cr)

One course from the following (3 cr):

Engl 313

Business Writing (3 cr)

Engl 316

Environmental Writing (3 cr) offered less frequently

Engl 317

Technical Writing (3 cr)

Cultural Diversity (One course in non-canonical or underrepresented literatures) (3 cr) Note: Engl 485 Global Literatures in English also will be approved to count toward the Cultural Diversity requirement.

Engl 380

Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures (3 cr)

Engl 480

Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr).

Engl 481

Women's Literature (3 cr).

Engl 483

African American Literature (3 cr).

Engl 484

American Indian Literature (3 cr). Fall semester

Or an adviser-approved special topics or extra-departmental course (3 cr)

English Electives (12 cr)

Four Engl courses, of which two must be at the 400-level; one of these two 400-level courses must be a linguistics course.

Capstone (3 cr)

Engl 440

Reading, Writing, and Rhetoric (3 cr) Typically Spring Semester

D. Teaching Emphasis [49 credits minimum in emphasis, plus other reqs.]

Foundations (3 cr)

Engl 215

Introduction to English Studies (3 cr) Prereq: Engl 102 or equiv.—seek to take this in fall semester of sophomore year or spring semester of first year, if offered

Literary History (15 cr)

Engl 257 or 258

Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)

Engl 341 (fall) or 342 (spring)

Survey of British Literature (3 cr)

Engl 343 (fall)-344 (spring)

Survey of American Literature (6 cr)

Engl 345

Shakespeare (3 cr) typically offered once a year

Language (10 cr)

Engl 201

English Grammar, Key Concepts and Terms (1 cr)

Engl 441

Intro to the Study of Language (3 cr) offered every semester

Two linguistics courses from the following (6 cr) Note: 448 Psycholinguistics will be added to the following list.

Engl 442

Introduction to English Syntax (3 cr) alt. spring semesters

Engl 443

Language Variation (3 cr) alt. spring semesters

Engl 496

History of the English Language (3 cr) Fall semester

Writing (9 cr)

Engl 309

Advanced Prose Writing (3 cr)

Engl 401

Writing Workshop for Teachers (3 cr)

One course from the following (3 cr):

Engl 208

(s) Personal and Exploratory Writing (3 cr)

Engl 291

Beginning Poetry Writing (3 cr)

Engl 292

Beginning Fiction Writing (3 cr)

Engl 293

Beginning Nonfiction Writing (3 cr)

Cultural Diversity (One course in non-canonical or underrepresented literatures) (3 cr) Note: Engl 485 Global Literatures in English also will be approved to count toward the Cultural Diversity requirement.

Engl 380

Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures (3 cr)

Engl 480

Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr).

Engl 481

Women's Literature (3 cr).

Engl 483

African American Literature (3 cr)

Engl 484

American Indian Literature (3 cr)/Fall semester

Or an adviser-approved special topics or extra-departmental course (3 cr)

400-level English electives (three 400-level English courses, two of which must be literature courses) (9 cr)

Capstone: This requirement is fulfilled for Teaching Emphasis majors by EDCI 485, Internship.

Teacher Certification: CLASS English majors wishing secondary teaching certification must complete the appropriate English and education courses listed in the "Teaching Majors and Minors" in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction section of this catalog. Students should plan their programs with their English advisor; they should also see a College of Education advisor regarding certification requirements.

Provisional Plan for English Teaching Emphasis Majors

  First Year: 

      Take general education core courses, including Psych 101 and Comm 101

      Begin foreign language core

      Take English 257 or 258 (and Engl 215 if available, and/or even EdCI 201)

 

Sophomore Year:

      Continue general education core courses

      Take EdCI 201(if you did not take this spring semester of first year)

      After EdCI 201, math and English core completed, apply for admission to College of Education teacher education program as "certification only" student.  (NOTE:  Be aware of requirements for admission to teacher certification, including GPA—2.75.) Once you are admitted, you should touch bases with your advisor in the College of Education.

      Begin introductory (Engl. 215 fall semester, or if possible, spring semester of first year) and 300-level survey courses in English department (American and Brit lit).

      Take creative writing course (208,291, 292, or 293)

      Take Engl. 201

      Finish foreign language core

  Perhaps take EDCI 301 in your sophomore year

Junior Year:

      Finish survey and take Engl 345 Shakespeare plus 400-level English literature courses.  You should take at least two of your three linguistics courses (beginning with Engl. 441)

      Take EDCI 301, 302, and EDSP 300.

      Take either Engl. 309 or 401 and creative writing course.  (Best to spread out the three writing courses.)

  Senior Year:

      Fall semester, take EdCI 431/441 (methods; only offered in fall semeter) and EdCI 463.

      Take 3rd linguistics course.

      Take rest of 400-level English courses (literature elective, ethnic lit, another 400-level elective, and 445).

Note about summer school:  Do not count on upper-division English courses being offered in the summer. The EdCI courses, with the exception of methods (431/441), have historically been offered in the summer.

 

Further information on courses:

Engl 175 Introduction to Literary Genres (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Introduction to the terminology, techniques, and formal characteristics of literary genres. Intended to provide the general student and the beginning English major with basic experience in literary analysis.

Engl 201 English Grammar: Key Concepts and Terms (1 cr)

Study of grammar and grammatical concepts; terms and concepts drawn from traditional and transformational grammar; includes practice in sentence diagramming with connections drawn to other grammatical systems. Not an ESL course and not remedial. (Spring only)

Engl 204 (s) Special Topics (cr arr)

Engl 207 (s) Persuasive Writing (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-a. Intermediate course in the practices of writing to persuade with special emphasis on current issues and audience awareness; includes research-based writing.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent

Engl 208 (s) Personal and Exploratory Writing (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-a. Intermediate course in the practices of personal and exploratory writing; may include personal narrative and observation, autobiography, or extended reflection; special attention to prose style and voice; includes research-based writing.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent

Engl 209 (s) Inquiry-Based Writing (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-a. Intermediate course in the uses of writing to explore and stake out intellectual positions; special emphasis on the nature of evidence used to develop and support knowledge claims in specific fields.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent

Engl 215 Introduction to English Studies (3 cr)

The gateway course for all English majors, focusing on goals of and opportunities opened by the various branches of English studies, the practice of close reading, critical terminology and issues central to English studies, and basic research and writing practices necessary for literary study.

Prereq: Engl 102

Engl 257 Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Masterpieces reflecting development of Western thought and culture. Classical Greece to the Renaissance.

Engl 258 Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Masterpieces reflecting development of Western thought and culture. 17th century to the present.

Engl 291 Beginning Poetry Writing (3 cr)

Intro to techniques of writing poetry.

Engl 292 Beginning Fiction Writing (3 cr)

Intro to techniques of writing fiction.

Engl 293 Beginning Nonfiction Writing (3 cr)

Intro to techniques of writing creative nonfiction.

Engl 309 Advanced Prose Writing (3 cr)

Theory and practice in writing prose; many assignments in expression, explanation, and persuasion.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent

Engl 310 Literary Theory (3 cr)

Current trends and issues in literary theory, with practice in the application of theory to literary texts.

Prereq: Engl 102 and 215

Engl 313 Business Writing (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-a. Principles and practice in writing business correspondence, memoranda, and reports that employ conventions, tone, and style appropriate to the specific discourse situation. Recommended for students with some business background or upper-level standing.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent; Sophomore standing

Engl 316 Environmental Writing (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-a. Principles and practice in writing related to communicating information about scientific and environmental issues to public audiences through proposals, correspondence, and essays or reports.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent; Junior standing or Permission

Engl 317 Technical Writing (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-a. Principles of clear writing related to technical style; problems such as technical description, proposals, formal reports, and technical correspondence.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent; Junior standing or Permission

Engl 341 Survey of British Literature (3 cr)

Medieval, Renaissance, 17th Century, Restoration, and 18th Century Literature

Engl 342 Survey of British Literature (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary literature

Engl 343 Survey of American Literature (3 cr)

Indigenous beginnings to the American Civil War.

Engl 344 Survey of American Literature (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Post-Civil War to contemporary writers.

Engl 345 Shakespeare (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Introductory course; background and study of selected plays representative of Shakespeare's achievement.

Engl 375 The Bible as Literature (3 cr)

Same as RelS 375. May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Literary qualities of the Bible.

Engl 380 Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures (3 cr)

Emphasis on U.S. minority writers and reading across cultures; selections will vary from semester to semester.

Engl 391 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3 cr)

Intermediate poetry writing workshop; emphasis on workshop approach, development of portfolio, continued reading in poetry.

Prereq: Engl 291 or Permission

Engl 392 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3 cr)

Intermediate fiction writing workshop; emphasis on workshop approach, development of portfolio, continued reading in fiction.

Prereq: Engl 292 or Permission

Engl 393 Intermediate Nonfiction Writing (3 cr)

Intermediate creative nonfiction; emphasis on workshop approach.

Prereq: Engl 293 or Permission

Engl 400 (s) Seminar (cr arr)

Engl 401 Writing Workshop for Teachers (3 cr)

Enrollment limited to juniors or seniors majoring or minoring in English or in secondary or elementary education programs. Develops students' writing abilities in a workshop setting adaptable to K-12 classrooms and includes theory and practice of teaching writing in elementary and secondary schools.

Engl 402 Internship in Tutoring Writing (3 cr)

Theoretical and practical issues involved in tutoring writing; directed experience tutoring students across the disciplines. Graded P/F.

Prereq: Engl 102 or Equivalent and Permission

Engl 404 (s) Special Topics (cr arr)

Engl J413/J513 ESL Methods I: Basic Oral/Aural Skills (3 cr)

Survey of most widely used classroom techniques for developing speaking and listening skills in a second language; alternative innovative approaches. Additional projects/assignments reqd for grad credit. (Fall, Alt/yrs)

Prereq: Engl 441 or Permission

Engl J414/J514 ESL Methods II: Reading, Writing, and Special Purpose English (3 cr)

Survey of most widely used classroom techniques for developing- reading and writing skills in a second language and teaching techniques to specialized professional programs. Additional projects required for grad credit. (Spring, Alt/yrs)

Prereq: Engl 441 or Permission

Engl 421 The English Novel (3 cr)

Offered in period survey, themes, or major authors.

Engl 425 Irish Literature (3 cr)

Studies in major Irish literary periods and authors.

Engl 426 Modern Poetry (3 cr)

Engl 427 Modern Fiction, 1900-1945 (3 cr)

Offered with emphasis on British and/or American writers.

Engl 429 Contemporary Fiction (3 cr)

Fiction since 1945; offered with emphasis on British and/or American writers.

Engl 431 Contemporary Poetry (3 cr)

Important poets from the latter part of the 20th century to the present. The instructor may survey the works of numerous poets, or may focus on as few as six. Recommended preparation: Engl 102 and Engl 175 or 210.

Engl 433 Chaucer (3 cr)

Intro to Chaucer's poetical works.

Engl 434 Medieval Literature (3 cr)

Offered in period survey, themes, or major authors.

Engl 437 English Drama (3 cr)

Offered in period survey, themes, or major authors.

Engl 440 (s) Reading, Writing, and Rhetoric (3 cr)

Selected Topics in rhetoric related to literary practices. (Spring)

Prereq: Engl 102

Engl 441 Introduction to the Study of Language (3 cr)

Same as Anth 441. Surveys of sound patterns, morphological processes and syntactic structures; questions of language acquisition, variation, and history; exercises from a variety of languages, with emphasis on American English.

Engl 442 Introduction to English Syntax (3 cr)

Structure and processes of English syntax; syntax as component of style. (Alt/yrs)

Prereq or Coreq: Engl 441 or Permission

Engl 443 Language Variation (3 cr)

Geographic and social dialects (e.g., Black English), levels of formality and their linguistic consequences; literary use of language variation (as in Dickens and Hardy, Twain and Faulkner); occupational dialects and jargons. (Alt/yrs)

Prereq or Coreq: Engl 441 or Permission

Engl 445 Literature for Adolescents (3 cr)

Theory and practice of literature study in secondary schools, and appraisal of literature appropriate to the needs, interests, and abilities of adolescents.

Prereq: Enrollment in a program leading to certification in Secondary English or Elementary Education (Elementary Education majors must have completed 6 cr of literature and EDCI 321; students in secondary ed programs must have completed 9 cr of literature); or Permission

Engl 448 Psycholinguistics (3 cr)

Same as Psyc 448. Survey of cognitive processes of language comprehension, language/speech production, and language acquisition. Recommended Preparation: Engl or Anth 441, Psyc 101.

Engl 451 Renaissance and 17th Century Literature (3 cr)

Normally offered in period survey, themes, or major authors.

Engl 456 Restoration and Eighteenth Century (3 cr)

Offered in period survey, themes, or major authors.

Engl 465 Romanticism (3 cr)

Offered in themes, genre studies, or major authors.

Engl 466 The Victorian Period (3 cr)

Offered in themes, genre studies, or major authors.

Engl 471 (s) Studies in American Literature before 1900 (3 cr)

Themes, issues, movements, and major authors of American literature before 1900.

Engl 473 (s) American Regional Literature (3 cr)

Studies in the distinctive qualities of literature from various U.S. regions, such as the West, the Northwest, the South, the Midwest, and New England.

Engl 475 (s) Studies in Literary Genres (3 cr)

Specific focus on developments within poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama and film.

Prereq: Engl 102

Engl 480 Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr)

Texts by ethnic and minority writers, primarily but not exclusively American; e.g., Black, Native American, Chicano, Asian American, Black South African. (Alt/yrs)

Engl 481 Women's Literature (3 cr)

Same as FLEN 481. May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Literature by women; genres, nationalities, and historical periods may vary from semester to semester. (Alt/yrs)

Engl 482 (s) Major Authors (3 cr, max arr)

Comprehensive study of the works of a single author. See the Class Schedule for author.

Engl 483 African American Literature (3 cr)

Major themes and traditions in African American texts.

Engl 484 American Indian Literature (3 cr)

May be used as core credit in J-3-d. Major themes and traditions in American Indian texts.

Engl 485 Global Literatures in English (3 cr)

Recent developments in international literature, with emphasis on literature from postcolonial Anglophone cultures and diasporic communities. Recommended preparation: Engl 215 and 258.

Engl 490 Senior Seminar (3 cr)

A capstone course in which students pursue individual projects that situate their areas of concentration within an interdisciplinary and practical/professional context. Required of English majors in literature, creative writing, and professional emphasis.

Prereq: Senior standing or 24 credits of English courses

Engl 491 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr, max arr)

Continuation of Engl 391.

Prereq: Engl 391 or Permission

Engl 492 Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr, max arr)

Continuation of Engl 392.

Prereq: Engl 392 or Permission

Engl 493 Advanced Nonfiction Writing (3 cr, max arr)

Advanced creative nonfiction; emphasis on workshop approach.

Prereq: Engl 393 or Permission

Engl 495 Literary Criticism (3 cr)

Historical developments in literary criticism.

Engl 496 History of the English Language (3 cr)

Evolution of the language from Proto-Germanic to American English. Recommended Preparation: Engl 441. (Fall only)

Engl 497 Practicum (1-3 cr, max 6)

Supervised experience in assisting in the teaching of an English course. Graded P/F. Prereq: upper-class standing and permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies.

Engl J498/J598 (s) Internship (1-3 cr, max 6)

Graded P/F. Supervised experience in professional uses of English. Additional projects/assignments reqd for grad cr. With advisor's approval, up to 3 credits of Engl 498 may be counted toward the undergraduate English major.

Prereq: Permission of Director of Graduate Studies or Director of Undergrad Studies, Department of English

Engl 499 (s) Directed Study (1-3 cr, max 3)

 

Note on general education core requirements that all majors need for degree—see further below: (1) after Engl 102, many English majors take Engl 207, or 208, or 209, or 313 to complete the Communication category in Gen Ed reqs.

(2) you must complete your Math, CS, or Stat req. during your first year.

(3) for the Natural and Applied Science 7-8crs req., some English majors take a CORS course first (during freshman year), followed by a required 4 cr lab science course

UI Catalog 2008+ Core

 

 

 

 

 

o   Humanities Courses
     AMST 301 Studies in American Culture (3 cr)
     ART 100 World Art and Culture (3 cr)
     ART 202 Early Modern Art and Aesthetics (3 cr)
     ART 205 Visual Culture (3 cr)
     ART 213 History and Theory of Modern Design (3 cr)
     ART 302 Modern Art and Theory (3 cr)
     ART 382 History of Photography (3 cr)
     ART 407 New Media (3 cr)
     DAN 100 Dance in Society (3 cr)
     ENGL 175 Introduction to Literary Genres (3 cr)
     ENGL 257 Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)
     ENGL 258 Literature of Western Civilization (3 cr)
     ENGL 342 Survey of British Literature (3 cr)
     ENGL 344 Survey of American Literature (3 cr)
     ENGL 345 Shakespeare (3 cr)
     ENGL/RELS 375 The Bible as Literature (3 cr)
     ENGL/FLEN 481 Women's Literature (3 cr)
     ENGL 484 American Indian Literature (3 cr)
     FLEN 313 Modern French Literature in Translation (3 cr)
     FLEN 324 Topics in German Literature in Translation (3 cr)
     FLEN 394 Latin American Literature in Translation (3 cr)
     IS 370 Africas Calling: The Culture of Ghana (3 cr)
     MUSH 101 Survey of Music (3 cr)
     MUSH 201 History of Rock and Roll (3 cr)
     PHIL 103 Ethics (3 cr)
     PHIL 201 Critical Thinking (3 cr)
     PHIL 240 Belief and Reality (3 cr)
     PHIL 351 Philosophy of Science (3 cr)
     PHIL 361 Professional Ethics (3 cr)
     THE 101 Introduction to the Theatre (3 cr)
     THE 468 Theatre History I (3 cr)
     THE 469 Theatre History II (3 cr)
     WMST 201 Introduction to Womens Studies (3 cr)

 

o   Social Science Courses
     AMST 201 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3 cr)
     ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology (3 cr)
     ANTH 220 Peoples of the World (3 cr)
     ANTH 329 North American Indians (3 cr)
     COMM 233 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr)
     COMM 335 Intercultural Communication (3 cr)
     COMM 410 Conflict Management (3 cr)
     ECON 201 Principles of Economics (3 cr)
     ECON 202 Principles of Economics (3 cr)
     ECON 272 Foundations of Economic Analysis (4 cr)
     FOR/CSS 235 Society and Natural Resources (3 cr)
     GEOG 165 Human Geography (3 cr)
     GEOG 200 World Regional Geography (3 cr)
     GEOG 365 Political Geography (3 cr)
     HIST 101 History of Civilization (3 cr)
     HIST 102 History of Civilization (3 cr)
     HIST 111 Introduction to U.S. History (3 cr)    
     HIST 112 Introduction to U.S. History (3 cr)
     JS 101 Introduction to the Justice System (3 cr)
     POLS 101 Introduction to Political Science and American Government (3 cr)
     POLS 205 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr)
     POLS 275 American State and Local Government (3 cr)
     POLS 338 American Foreign Policy (3 cr)
     PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 cr)
     SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)
     SOC 230 Social Problems (3 cr)
     SOC 250 Social Conflict (3 cr)
     THE 386 Documentary Film (3 cr)

 

o   International Courses
     AGEC 481 Agricultural Markets in a Global Economy (3 cr)
     AGED 406 Exploring International Agriculture (2 cr)
     ANTH 220 Peoples of the World (3 cr)
     ANTH 261 Language and Culture (3 cr)
     ANTH 462 Human Issues in International Development (3 cr)
     ART 100 World Art and Culture (3 cr)
     ART 202 Early Modern Art and Aesthetics (3 cr)
     ART/RELS 208 Italian Renaissance Art and Culture (3 cr)
     ART 213 History and Theory of Modern Design I (3 cr)
     ART 302 Modern Art and Theory (3 cr)
     ART 303 Contemporary Art and Theory (3 cr)
     ART 313 History and Theory of Modern Design II (3 cr)
     CHIN 201 Chinese Third Semester (4 cr)
     CHIN 202 Chinese Fourth Semester (4 cr)
     COMM 335 Intercultural Communication (3 cr)
     CORE 107 Cultural Encounters: The Latino Story (4 cr)
     CORE 113 Globalization (4 cr)
     CORE 116 The Sacred Journey: Religions of the World (4 cr)
     CORE 117 The Movies, The World, and You (4 cr)
     CORE 127 War and Our World (4 cr)
     CORE 157 Cultural Encounters: The Latino Story (3 cr)
     CORE 163 Globalization (3 cr)
     CORE 166 The Sacred Journey: Religions of the World (3 cr)
     CORE 167 The Movies, The World, and You (3 cr)
     CORE 177 War and Our World (3 cr)
     ECON 446 International Economics (3 cr)
     ECON 447 Economics of Developing Countries (3 cr)
     ENGL/FLEN 481 Women's Literature (3 cr)
     FCS 411 Global Nutrition (2 cr)
     FCS 419 Dress and Culture (3 cr)
     FLEN 307 The European Union (3 cr)
     FLEN 324 German Literature in Translation (3 cr)
     FLEN/The 391 Hispanic Film (3 cr)
     FLEN 394 Latin American Literature in Translation (3 cr)
     FREN 201 Intermediate French I (4 cr)
     FREN 202 Intermediate French II (4 cr)
     GEOG 165 Human Geography (3 cr)
     GEOG 200 World Regional Geography (3 cr)
     GEOG 350 Geography of Development (3-4 cr)
     GEOG 360 Population Dynamics and Distribution (3-4 cr)
     GEOG 365 Political Geography (3 cr)
     GERM 201 Intermediate German I (4 cr)
     GERM 202 Intermediate German II (4 cr)
     IS 370 Africas Calling: The Culture of Ghana (3 cr)
     ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I (4 cr)
     ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II (4 cr)
     JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I (4 cr)
     JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II (4 cr)
     LARC 390 Italian Hill Towns and Urban Centers (3 cr)
     POLS 205 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr)
     RUSS 201 Third Semester Russian (4 cr)
     RUSS 202 Fourth Semester Russian (4 cr)
     SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I (4 cr)
     SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II (4 cr)
     THE 221 History of World Cinema I (3 cr)
     THE 222 History of World Cinema II (3 cr)
     THE 467 Asian Theatre History (3 cr)

 

 

Additional Note for Prospective Freshmen

If you are admitted to the university and visit campus on Vandal Friday (late March), it may be possible for you to preregister for fall classes ahead of everyone else!

If you have questions or need assistance, you may use the UI toll-free number, 1-888-884-3246, which will reach the campus operator who can connect you with any campus office. You may also call the Department of English at (208) 885-6156, or send an email message to your advisor.

GENERAL INFORMATION: Unlike most high school classes, all University of Idaho courses are only one semester long. Some courses are continuations of others which must be taken first. These courses which must be taken first are called prerequisites. For example, Math 143 must be taken (or by placement or credit received) before Math 170; for foreign language sequences, however, you might well be proficient enough to enroll in a higher level course, and therefore would bypass Spanish 101, for example, to enroll directly in Spanish 102 (or Span 201). Other departments offer sequences of courses which needn't be taken in any order. For example, History 101 and History 102 World History are essentially the same course, but cover different time periods (again, each is one semester long). Yet, History 101 is not a prerequisite for History 102. If you plan to take both, you may prefer to take 101 first, although that is not required. In some disciplines, introductory courses are offered at the 200 level--for example, English 257 and English 258 are designed to introduce freshmen to the literature of Western Civilization.

You will have a faculty member as an academic advisor, but ultimately you must take responsibility for your degree requirements and each semester's schedule. Most departments have a four or five-year plan for each major, or at least a check-off sheet of required courses. Ask your advisor for one of these if you have not already received one by the time you arrive on campus. Get to know your general university catalog very well. Always look ahead--know what courses have prerequisites and what those prerequisites are (especially important for upper division courses).

Guide to English Composition Placement

University Honors Program. Be sure to check out this site if you are admitted to the honors program or interested in learning more about it. For example, members of the honors progam should plan to enroll in at least one honors course their first semester (such as an honors CORE section), and should try to avoid taking non-honors sections of courses that are offered through the honors program (such as English 257 and 258, Psych 101, and so on).